3 exciting emerging interventional treatments for Parkinson’s disease

Parkinson’s disease (PD) is one of the bedrock disorders of neurology. It is common, universal, well-defined, usually easily diagnosed, and eminently treatable, even if not curable. PD is so important that I have visited it so many times on this blog. My previous blog posts on this topic include:

What are the drugs promising neuroprotection in PD?

What is the state of Parkinson’s disease biomarkers? 

The emerging research boosting Parkinson’s disease treatment.

PD is debilitating even when treated. This is because of the staggering number of motor and non-motor symptoms it provokes. And there is the long list of side effects the treatments induce, such as abnormal movements called dyskinesias. There is therefore a never-ending need for more effective and less agonising treatments for PD. And this blog has kept a keen eye on any advances that will make this disorder more bearable for the sufferers and their families, and less nerve-racking for the treating neurologist. It is therefore gratifying to know that there are many developments in the management of PD, and here I focus on 3 emerging interventional treatments.

By Marvin 101 – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=7533521

 

Magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS)

MRgFUS is a technique that uses thermal heat to create lesions in the brain. This is a much less invasive approach than the current interventional treatments for PD which are surgery and deep brain stimulation (DBS). Surgical interventions for PD work by making therapeutic lesions in the globus pallidus (pallidotomy). In a first of its kind, Young Cheol Na and colleagues used MRgFUS to create similar pallidal lesions. They published their finding in 2015 in the journal Neurology under the title Unilateral magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound pallidotomy for Parkinson disease. They reported improvement in the motor symptoms of PD, and in drug-induced dyskinesias. But before MRgFUS pallidotomy will take off, it has to be as good as surgical pallidotomy which reduces dyskinesias for as long as 12 years!

Blue sonar. Gisela Giardino on Flickr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/gi/192984384

Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) 

In a reasonably large randomized trial published in 2016 in the journal Neurology, Miroslaw Brys and colleagues reported that rTMS improves motor symptoms in PD. Titled Multifocal repetitive TMS for motor and mood symptoms of Parkinson disease, the study reports that the benefit was significant. Indeed a systematic review and meta-analysis by Ying-hui Chou and colleagues in the journal JAMA Neurology, published just the year before, had established the benefit of rTMS in PD. The review, titled Effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on motor symptoms in Parkinson disease, concluded with the hope that their findings “may guide treatment decisions and inform future research“. Hopefully it has, because a 2018 paper, published in the Journal of Clinical Neuroscience, has gone on to establish that the best results for rTMS are obtained with stimulation of the primary and supplementary motor cortex. That’s scientific progress.

Magnetic Fields-15. Windell Oskay on Flickr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/oskay/4581194252

Spinal cord stimulation 

It appears counterintuitive to think of the spinal cord in the context of PD, which is after all a disease of the brain. That is until you remember that walking impairment is a major problem in PD, and the spinal cord is the gateway for gait. Inspired by this insight, Carolina Pinto de Souza and colleagues stimulated the spinal cords of people with PD who have already undergone deep brain stimulation surgery. They published their findings in the journal Movement Disorders with the title Spinal cord stimulation improves gait in patients with Parkinson’s disease previously treated with deep brain stimulation. A clear title like this leaves little room for commentary. The authors however studied only four subjects, a number clearly missing from the paper’s title, but the benefit is an encouraging 50-65% improvement in gait. The omission is forgiven.

Spinal cord 8. GreenFlames09 on Flickr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/greenflames09/116396804

Taking things a step further, Reon Kobayashi and colleagues, writing in the journal Parkinsonism and Related Disorders, reported that a new mode of spinal cord stimulation called BurstDR, does a much better job than conventional stimulation. Again, the title of the paper is self-explanatory: New mode of burst spinal cord stimulation improved mental status as well as motor function in a patient with Parkinson’s disease.

By Images are generated by Life Science Databases(LSDB). – from Anatomography, website maintained by Life Science Databases(LSDB).You can get and edit this image through URL below. 次のアドレスからこのファイルで使用している画像を取得・編集できますURL., CC BY-SA 2.1 jp, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=7932266

Surely the future must be bright with all these developments in the field of PD.

Does IIH increase the risk of cerebrovascular events?

Association between idiopathic intracranial hypertension and risk of cardiovascular diseases in women in the United Kingdom. Adderley NJ, Subramanian A, Nirantharakumar K, et al. JAMA Neurol 2019 (Epub ahead of print). Abstract BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk has not been previously evaluated in a large matched cohort study in idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH). OBJECTIVES: To […]

via Does IIH increase the risk of cerebrovascular events? — Neurochecklists Blog

How do hand postures localise the site of seizure onset in epilepsy?

Hand posture as localizing sign in adult focal epileptic seizures. Ferando I, Soss JR, Elder C, et al. Ann Neurol 2019; 86:793-800. Abstract OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to identify specific ictal hand postures (HPs) as localizing signs of the epileptogenic zone (EZ) in patients with frontal or temporal lobe epilepsy. METHODS: In this study, we retrospectively […]

via How do hand postures localise the site of seizure onset in epilepsy? — Neurochecklists Blog

The 12 most viewed blog posts on The Neurology Lounge in 2019

2019 saw almost 20,000 visitors to this blog.

Almost 300 blog posts were viewed.

And 60 of these were freshly posted in 2019.

Keyboard From Stone Age. Libor Krayzel on Flickr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/elka_cz/126813739

So which of our 2019 blog posts attracted the most attention?

Giant #life size #Keyboard. Wicker Paradise on Flickr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/wicker-furniture/8601135380

Here is our countdown of…

…the 12 most viewed blog posts of 2019!

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12.

What are the pitfalls and perils of intracranial pressure?

11.

What is the last word on migraine and PFOs?

10.

What should we really know about cerebral aneurysms?

 

9.

7 epic historical rivalries that shaped neuroscience

8.

The emerging links between Alzheimer’s disease and infections

 

7.

18 most insightful and profound quotations about the brain

6.

9 promising advances in the management of traumatic brain injury

5.

15 more creative and catchy neurology headlines for 2019

4.

What, precisely, is the Alice in Wonderland syndrome?

3.

Mozart and epilepsy: the rhythm beats on

2.

The 9 neurological manifestations of anti MOG antibody disorder

1.

The 10 most viewed neurology videos on Youtube

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What are the 12 most interesting neurological questions of 2019?

It’s that time of the year again… When we look back and reflect… Over how many visitors took a peek… And what most piqued their interest. *** >10,000 people visited our blog in 2019… They viewed >300 abstracts… Of which >70 were freshly minted in 2019. *** Our visitors favoured some abstracts over others, So we […]

via What are the 12 most interesting neurological questions of 2019? — Neurochecklists Blog

7 remarkable technologies shaping the future of the brain

The brain is the most enigmatic structure in the universe. But every now and then, the brain malfunctions. And just like Humpty Dumpty, we struggle to put it back together again…at least not to its previous level of complex organisation. But we are remarkably ingenious creatures, obviously because we possess great brains, and we are ever-inventing brilliant schemes to fix the brain (or at least our brains are). And we, or our brains, often conjure up unthinkable technologies (pardon the intended pun!) Over the years this blog has tried to keep up with these improbable schemes, and you can check the veracity of this claim by looking up two of my very old blog posts on this:

6 exciting neuroscience discoveries that will shape neurology

 10 remarkable breakthroughs that will change neurology.

But the developments keep rolling in, so here are 7 remarkable technologies shaping the future of the brain.

Artificial neurones

What if you could just replace your damaged nerves with spare neurones-just as you would replace a faulty spark plug in your car (OK, wrong analogy for many people I know). Well, this may not be a fantasy for too long. This comes from a piece in Popular Science titled Artificial neurones could replace some real ones in your brain. The article says “Swedish researchers have developed a synthetic neuron that is able to communicate chemically with organic neurones, which could change the neural pathways and better treat neurological disorders”. This is just understandable enough for most people and I will go no further. But if you desire the hard science version, with references to biomimetic neurones, (or is it neurons?), you may check out the original study in the journal Biosensors and Bioelectronics ; it does come with a slightly shorter and less convoluted, but totally undecipherable title, An organic electronic biomimetic neuron enables auto-regulated neuromodulation. I will stick to the Popular Science version.

Brain 22. Affen Aljfe on Flickr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/142299342@N06/32794072623 http://www.modup.net/

Bionic memory

One major disorder everyone fears is dementia. The concept of forgetting, not just your experiences but family, friends, and eventually yourself, is frightening. But what if you could rely on an electronic memory. A start in this direction was a report that researchers have built a nano memory cell that mimics the way humans lay down memory. At 10,000 sizes smaller than a human hair, such an external memory will surely prove useful. But just take a breath and imagine what it will be like to be incapable of forgetting! Solomon Shereshevsky on my mind. Some way to go yet. This story is sourced from the website Mashable but the research itself is published in the journal Advanced Functional Materials with the, again, cryptic title Donor‐induced performance tuning of amorphous SrTiO3 memristive nanodevices: multistate resistive switching and mechanical tunability. Stick to the translated version in Mashable.

Artificial-intelligence-503593_1920. Many Wonderful Artists on Flickr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/alansimpsonme/34715802120

Memory implants

Most people do not want extraordinary memories and would just want to access the ones they have laid down. Some of these are however buried so deep in the crypts of their brains, they have become inaccessible. Again, technology may have something to promise them. And this comes in the form of a memory boosting brain implant. This device, developed by US Defence scientists, can detect how we retrieve memory, and predict when this will fail, and kick in to action to save the day. A sort of brain pacemaker you may say. The potential benefit is in head injury, but we can all do with a little help every now and then, when the ‘uhms’ and the ‘aahs’ kick in. This piece comes from Science Alert but the original article is on the website of the Defence Advanced Research Project Agency (DARPA), and it is titled Targeted Electrical Stimulation of the Brain Shows Promise as a Memory Aid. Not a bad one this time.

Machine Learning & Artificial Intelligence. Mike MacKenzie on Flickr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/mikemacmarketing/42271822770 www.vpnsrus.com

Neural prosthetics

Another technology promising to help memory is neural prosthetics. These serve to directly send our short-term memories into long-term storage, bypassing the hippocampus when it is too defective to do the job properly. This comes from a piece in Science Daily titled Scientists to bypass brain damage by re-encoding memories. What the prosthesis does is “to bypass a damaged hippocampal section and provide the next region with the correctly translated memory”. In effect it will make the hippocampus redundant. I’m sure the hippocampus does other things apart from encode memories… but we don’t want to think of that now.

Artificial Intelligence – Resembling Human Brain. Deepak Pal on Flikr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/158301585@N08/43267970922

Thought-evoked movements

Imagine being able to move a robotic limb by just thinking about it. No, not telepathy, but with your brain wired to the limb. This is what a prosthetic technology promises for people with brain damage who are unable to move. The prosthetic is implanted in the part of the brain that initiates our intention to move. The source for this story comes from USC News, and it is titled Neural prosthetic device yields fluid motions by robotic arm. In the example cited in the piece, the surgeons “implanted a pair of small electrode arrays in two parts of the posterior parietal cortex-one that controls reach and another that controls grasp“. You have to see the robotic arm in action. Sci-fi is becoming reality in a brain lab near you soon.

3D Brain Sculpture STL model. Misanthropic one on Flikr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/22902505@N05/14780918556

Behavioural remote control

Press a button and alter behaviour. Exciting and scary at the same time. But this is what chemogenetics promises, or threatens, depending on your point of view. This one comes from a piece on the website Neuroscience News titled Chemogenetics technique turns mouse behaviour on and off. The technique “achieves remote control by introducing a synthetic brain chemical messenger system that integrates with the workings of naturally-occurring systems”. ‘Integrate’ feels a tad extreme, almost like being assimilated by the Borg. But I suppose it will be no worse than the antipsychotics and sedatives we currently use to control the behaviour of people with schizophrenia and addictive disorders. It surely looks like it has potential, at least in mice for now.

artificial-intelligence-2167835_1280. Many Wonderful Artisits on Flickr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/alansimpsonme/34752491210

Cognitive enhancement

This technology goes beyond just increasing the ability to preserve or retrieve memory. It sets out to make the brain smarter. This piece comes from The Atlantic and is titled Why cognitive enhancement is in your future (and your past). The technology is transcranial direct current stimulation (TDCS) of the deeper reaches of the brain, using electrodes to send small and painless electrical currents. The currents are thought to increase neuroplasticity, and this enables neurons (or perhaps neurones?) to form the connections necessary for learning.

Brains. Neil Conway on Flickr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/neilconway/3792906411

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It is mind-boggling enough just thinking that people out there are thinking of stuff like these! But it is equally reassuring that the future of the brain is bright.

12 completely new and topical neurochecklists

Neurochecklists is continuously pushing the limits. This is why it remains comprehensive and topical Why not confirm this for yourself. Below are just 12 completely new checklists. *** Cannabidiol (CBD) Visual snow syndrome Cryptogenic stroke Insular seizures Decompression sickness Hereditary haemochromatosis Essential thrombocythemia Topographical disorientation SYNGAP1 epileptic encephalopathy Neuroparacoccidiodomycosis Gadolinium contrast enhancement patterns Neuronal intranuclear […]

via 12 completely new and topical neurochecklists — Neurochecklists Blog