What are the emerging treatments for neurofibromatosis?

Neurofibromatosis (NF) is one of the major neurocutaneous disorders neurologists see. These are disorders which primarily affect the nervous system and have prominent skin manifestations. Also known as phakomatoses, they are typified by abnormal growths and a variety of cancers. They include well-defined conditions such as tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), Sturge-Weber syndrome (SWS), von Hipple Lindau disease (VHL), schwannomatosis, and the various PTEN hamartoma tumour syndromes. There are two types of neurofibromatosis, NF1 and NF2. NF2 is characterised by vestibular schwannomas, tumours arising from the sheath that encases the nerve that control balance, and by meningiomas, tumours of the covering of the brain.

By RadsWiki – RadsWiki, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=3520114

NF1, also known as von Recklinghausen disease is, by far, the commoner form of neurofibromatosis. It is readily recognised on the skin by the frequently multiple and disfiguring nerve tumours called neurofibromas. Other benign skin lesions include the coffee-coloured skin lesions aptly called cafe-au-lait spots, armpit lesions called axillary freckles, and small lesions on the iris of the eyes called Lisch nodules. More sinister skin lesions called malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours (MPNST) are, as the name implies, capable of spreading to other organs such as the lungs. Other sinister tumours in NF1 include gliomas of the brain and optic nerve, gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST) of the gut, and rhabdomyosarcomas of bone.

By Seiradcruz at English Wikipedia, CC BY-SA 3.0, Link

What can neurologists do for people with neurofibromatosis? Traditionally, nothing much apart from watchful waiting. We would monitor for the development of tumours by regular surveillance MRI scans of the brain and spine, and refer people with painful, compressive, or malignant lesions to the plastic surgeons or neurosurgeons to do what they do best, taking things out. Surgery may work fine for simple neurofibromas, but it is less practical for the complex or plexiform type. Thankfully, many neuroscientists are working hard, looking at different approaches to managing neurofibromas. To illustrate, below are 5 emerging treatments for neurofibromatosis. 

Bởi Klaus D. Peter, Gummersbach, GermanySelf-photographed, CC BY 3.0 de, Liên kết

 

Selumetinib

In a 2016 paper in the New England Journal of Medicine, Eva Dombi and colleagues investigated the effect of selumetinib, an oral inhibitor of an enzyme called MAPK kinase (MEK) in 24 children with NF1. The paper, titled Activity of selumetinib in neurofibromatosis type 1-related plexiform neurofibromas, showed that selumetinib reduced the size of neurofibromas, and there was evidence that it improved pain and reduced disfigurement.

By Dimitrios MalamosOwn work, CC BY 4.0, Link

Imatinib

In a 2012 paper published in Lancet Oncology, Kent Robertson and colleagues, investigated the potential benefit of Imitanib, an inhibitor of the enzyme tyrosine kinase, in 36 people with NF1. The paper, titled Imitatinib mesylate for plexiform neurofibromas in patients with neurofibromatosis type 1: a phase 2 trial, showed at least a 20% reduction in one or more plexiform neurofibromas.

By Department of Pathology, Calicut Medical College – Calicut Medical College, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=36652650

Sirolimus

Brian Weiss and colleagues investigated the effect of sirolimus, an inhibitor of mTOR complex 1, in 46 people with NF1 and published their findings in the journal Neuro-Onclology. The paper, titled Sirolimus for progressive neurofibromatosis type 1-associated plexiform neurofibromas, demonstrated that sirolimus prolonged the time to progression (TTP) of plexiform neurofibromas by about 4 months. A modest effect they admit, but nevertheless, a hope-raising effect.

By ajc3527 – Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=59202851

Everolimus

Everolimus is already making waves in the treatment of various lesions in tuberous sclerosis complex, and it is not surprising that it has turned up here. In their paper titled Treatment of disfiguring cutaneous lesions in neurofibromatosis-1 with everolimus, published in the journal Drugs in R&D, John Slopis and colleagues reported that everolimus significantly reduced the surface volume of NF1 lesions, including plexiform neurofibromas. The authors were however cautious, calling for future studies to confirm these results. Unfortunately, one such study in the Journal of Investigational Dermatology poured cold water on the reported benefit of everolimus. The paper was titled Absence of Efficacy of Everolimus in Neurofibromatosis 1-Related Plexiform Neurofibromas: Results from a Phase 2a Trial. Hopefully future studies will be more favourable!

By MarinaVladivostokOwn work, CC0, Link

Pegylated interferon alfa-2b

Regina Jakacki and colleagues looked at the effect of pegylated interferon alfa-2b on plexiform neurofibromas and found a greater than doubling of their time to progression (TTP). Their paper is published in Neuro-Oncology, and it is titled Phase II trial of pegylated interferon alfa-2b in young patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 and unresectable plexiform neurofibromas. As the authors studied a reasonable number of subjects, 84, and as the trial was placebo-controlled trial, this result is unlikely to be overturned by future trials…but only time will tell.

By Nevit Dilmen – Self created from PDB entry with Cn3D Data Source: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/Structure/, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=1308980

 

Therefore is clearly enough justification for hope in the search for a cure for neurofibromatosis.

What are the new diseases emerging in neurology?

Medical futurists predict that scientific advances will lead to more precise definition of diseases. This will inevitably result in the emergence of more diseases and fewer syndromes. This case is made very eloquently in the book, The Innovators Prescription. Many neurological disorders currently wallow at the intuitive end of medical practice, and their journey towards precision medicine is painfully too slow. Neurology therefore has a great potential for the emergence of new disorders.

https://pixabay.com/en/pie-chart-diagram-statistics-parts-149727/
https://pixabay.com/en/pie-chart-diagram-statistics-parts-149727/

In the ‘good old days’, many diseases were discovered by individual observers working alone, and the diseases were named after them. In this way, famous diseases were named after people such as James Parkinson, Alois Alzheimer, and George Huntington. For diseases discovered by two or three people, it didn’t take a great stretch of the imagination to come up with double-barrelled names such as Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS) or Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS).

By uncredited - Images from the History of Medicine (NLM) [1], Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=11648572
By uncredited – Images from the History of Medicine (NLM) [1], Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=11648572
Today, however, new diseases emerge as a result of advances made by large collaborations, working across continents. These new diseases are named after the pathological appearance or metabolic pathways involved (as it will require an act of genius to create eponymous syndromes to cater for all the scientists and clinicians involved in these multi-centre trials). This is unfortunately why new disorders now have very complex names and acronyms. Take, for examples, chronic lymphocytic inflammation with pontine perivascular enhancement responsive to steroids (CLIPPERS) and chronic relapsing inflammatory optic neuropathy (CRION). It is a sign that we should expect new neurological diseases to be baptised with more descriptive, but tongue-twisting, names.

 

https://pixabay.com/en/letters-a-abc-alphabet-literacy-67046/
https://pixabay.com/en/letters-a-abc-alphabet-literacy-67046/

New disease categories emerge in different ways. One is the emergence of a new disorder from scratch, with no antecedents whatsoever. Such was the case with autoimmune encephalitis, a category which has come from relative obscurity to occupy the centre stage of eminently treatable diseases. I have posted on this previously as What’s evolving at the cutting edge of autoimmune neurology and What are the dreadful autoimmune disorders that plague neurology? Other disease categories form when different diseases merge into a completely new disease category, or when a previously minor diseases mature and stand on their own feet. These are the stuff of my top 8 emerging neurological disorders.

 

By Photo (c)2007 Derek Ramsey (Ram-Man) - Self-photographed, CC BY-SA 2.5, Link
By Photo (c)2007 Derek Ramsey (Ram-Man) – Self-photographed, CC BY-SA 2.5, Link

1. mTORopathy

This huge monster is ‘threatening’ to bring together, under one roof, diverse disorders such as tuberous sclerosis complex, epilepsy, autism, traumatic brain injury, brain tumours, and dementia. You may explore this further in my previous blog post titled mTORopathy: an emerging buzzword for neurology.

Merging bubbles. Charlie Reece on Flikr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/charliereece/777487250
Merging bubbles. Charlie Reece on Flikr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/charliereece/777487250

2. IgG4-related autoimmune diseases

This new group of neurological diseases is threatening to disrupt the easy distinction between several neurological disorders such as myasthenia gravis (MG), chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP), and Guillain Barre syndrome (GBS). It even includes the newly described IgLON 5 antibody disorder, something I blogged about as IgLON5: a new antibody disorder for neurologists. You may explore IgG4-related disorders in this paper titled The expanding field of IgG4-mediated neurological autoimmune disorders. 

By Aida Pitarch - Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, Link
By Aida PitarchOwn work, CC BY-SA 4.0, Link

3. Anti-MOG antibody disorders

Now, neurologists have always known about MOG, mostly as a minor bit player, an extra, so to say. No more, it is now all grown up and matured. And the growth is fast and involves many inflammatory demyelinating disease of the CNS such as fulminant demyelinating encephalomyelitis and multiphasic disseminated encephalomyelitis. How far will it go?

http://thebluediamondgallery.com/a/autoimmune.html
http://thebluediamondgallery.com/a/autoimmune.html

4. Hepatitis E virus related neurological disorders

A field which is spurning new neurological disorders is neurological infections, and Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is in the forefront. We are now increasingly recognising diverse Hepatitis E related neurological disorders. HEV has now been linked to diseases such as Guillain Barre syndrome (GBS) and brachial neuritis. And the foremost researcher in this area is Harry Dalton, a hepatologist working from Cornwall, not far from me! And Harry will be presenting at the next WESAN conference in Exeter in November 2017.

By Transferred from en.wikipedia to Commons.This media comes from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Public Health Image Library (PHIL), with identification number #5605.Note: Not all PHIL images are public domain; be sure to check copyright status and credit authors and content providers.English | Slovenščina | +/−, Public Domain, Link
By Transferred from en.wikipedia to Commons.This media comes from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention‘s Public Health Image Library (PHIL), with identification number #5605.Note: Not all PHIL images are public domain; be sure to check copyright status and credit authors and content providers.English | Slovenščina | +/−, Public Domain, Link

5. Zika virus

Zika virus is another novel infection with prominent neurological manifestations. We are learning more about it every day, and you may check my previous blog post on this, titled 20 things we now know for certain about the Zika virus.

By Manuel Almagro Rivas - Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=47941048
By Manuel Almagro RivasOwn work, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=47941048

6. Multisystem proteinopathy

Multisystem proteinopathy is a genetic disorder which affects muscles and bone, in addition to the nervous system. It is associated with Paget’s disease of the bone and inclusion body myositis, with implications for motor neurone disease (MND) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Quite a hydra-headed monster it seems, all quite complex, and perhaps one strictly for the experts.

Hydra. Andrew Jian on Flikr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/andrew_jian/475479747
Hydra. Andrew Jian on Flikr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/andrew_jian/475479747

7. GLUT-1 deficiency syndromes

GLUT-1 stands for glucose transporter type 1. Deficiency of GLUT-1 results in impaired transportation of glucose into the brainGLUT-1 deficiency syndrome presents with a variety of neurological features such as dystonia, epilepsy, ataxia, chorea, and a host of epilepsy types. It starts in infancy and is characterised by a low level of glucose and lactic acid in the cerebrospinal fluid. Expect to hear more on this in the near future.

Sugar Cubes. David pacey on Flikr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/63723146@N08/7164573186
Sugar Cubes. David pacey on Flikr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/63723146@N08/7164573186

8. Progressive Solitary Sclerosis

And this is my favourite paradigm shifter. Neurologists often see people with brain inflammatory lesions and struggle to decide if they fulfil the criteria for multiple sclerosis (MS). The current threshold for concern is when there have been two clinical events consistent with inflammation of the nervous system, or their MRI scan shows involvement of at least two different sites of the nervous system. Well, dot counting may soon be over, going by this paper in Neurology titled Progressive solitary sclerosis: gradual motor impairment from a single CNS demyelinating lesion. The authors identified 30 people with progressive clinical impairment arising from a single inflammatory nervous system lesion. The authors were convinced enough to recommend the inclusion of this new entity, progressive solitary sclerosis, in future classifications of inflammatory disorders of the central nervous system. Move over progressive MS, here comes progressive SS. Neurologists will surely have their job cut out for them.

Solitary tree at Sunset. epcp on Flikr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/epcprince/3418260382
Solitary tree at Sunset. epcp on Flikr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/epcprince/3418260382

Do you have any suggestions of emerging neurological disorders? Please leave a comment

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PS. These disorders are all covered in neurochecklists

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mTORopathy: an emerging buzzword for neurology

I was recently perplexed with my first case of tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). I had no idea what treatment, monitoring and surveillance I needed to institute. I quickly checked things up in neurochecklists; I found excellent checklists on the pathology and clinical features, but was disappointed that there were no treatment or monitoring checklists. I quickly hunted down TSC diagnostic criteria and TSC surveillance recommendations and updated neurochecklists. Phew!

By Herbert L. Fred, MD and Hendrik A. van Dijk - http://cnx.org/content/m14895/latest/, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=11892420
By Herbert L. Fred, MD and Hendrik A. van Dijk – http://cnx.org/content/m14895/latest/, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=11892420

In the process I discovered that TSC features may improve on treatment with a class of drugs called mTOR inhibitors. Highfalutin stuff I said to myself, and thought nothing more of it. I had to reassess my opinion very shortly afterwards when I came across the Association of British Neurologists (ABN) SoundCloud page with ABN President Phil Smith interviewing Ingrid Scheffer on epilepsy genetics.

We have all experienced that disquieting feeling of just learning something new, and then seeing it crop up all over the place. This is what I felt when Ingrid Scheffer casually stated that Tuberous Sclerosis is an mTORopathy. mTOR is big enough to be an ‘opathy‘, and I was completely ignorant of it! And how come I haven’t heard of Ingrid Scheffer before now-serves me right for missing the last ABN conference in Brighton.

I decided to dig a bit deeper and here are 9 things about mTOR I discovered:

1

mTOR stands for mammalian (or mechanistic) target of rapamycin

2

mTOR is a kinase

3

The mTOR pathway is important in regulating cell growth and cell death

4

mTOR has an important role in many disorders (mTORopathies). These include tuberous sclerosis, epilepsy, autism, traumatic brain injury, brain tumours, and dementia

5

Mutations in TSC1 or TSC2 genes cause hyperactivation of the mTOR pathway

6

mTOR inhibitors are under investigation for the treatment of these diverse diseases

7

Sirolimus is the major mTOR inhibitor

By Fvasconcellos - Own work, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=1549073
By FvasconcellosOwn work, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=1549073

8

The DEPDC5 gene regulates mTOR inhibition.

9

The DEPDC5 gene is mutated in many neurological disorders such as familial focal epilepsies, focal cortical dysplasia, and epileptic spasms. These constitute DEPDC5 motoropathies.

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Enough information to tickle the little grey cells but if you want to dig deeper than you may follow these links: