A few more catchy titles from the world of neurology

Here we go again. Neurologists can’t seem to stop spinning them, and we can’t help weaving them into blog posts. If you are late to the game, you may catch up with our previous catchy titles:

The art of spinning catchy titles
The art of spinning catchy neurology headlines
A few more catchy neurology article titles to start the year
15 more creative and catchy neurology headlines for 2019

Now that you are up-to-date, here are 10 more catchy neurology article titles to make your day: 

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Optic neuritis in the diagnosis of MS: more than meets the eye

This article looks at a common symptom of multiple sclerosis (MS), and makes the strong case that we need to do more to diagnose optic neuritis. And it is a very catchy way to make the point.

Optic nerve fron view. Francisco Bengoa on Flickr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/frecuenciamedicafb/7404373518/

The many faces of oral-facial-digital syndrome

This is not something neurologists often come across, but it comes close enough to the specialty. Oral-facial-digital-syndrome is typified by facial deformities, but more importantly, the title makes it clear that it is a syndrome with diverse subtypes. A catchy title for a rare disorder, and this paper reveals all.

Ben Eine – The Strangest Week. Bob Bob on Flickr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/bobaliciouslondon/5196843736

The new concussion in sport guidelines are here. But how do we get them out there?

Not all catchy titles are convoluted. This one is simple but yet very inspired. It refers to the 2016 Consensus Statement on Concussion in Sport. As for all guidelines, it is all well and good to develop them, but a herculean task to get anyone to take notice. It is therefore very ingenious to use a catchy editorial to do the job.

By shgmom56 on Flickr – Originally posted to Flickr as “DSC02769”, CC BY-SA 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=4231521

The great escape: a neuropsychological study of psychogenic amnesia

This is just a case report of fugue state, but it comes with a great title. The perspective of psychological amnesia as an escape is appropriate, and to the point.

By Wassily Kandinski – http://www.abcgallery.com/K/kandinsky/kandinsky73.html, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=2174133

When the past is lost: focal retrograde amnesia

Another one on amnesia, and what a great title. It is a report of 13 cases of focal retrograde amnesia, all typified by loss of autobiographical memory. The amnesia is severe enough in some cases “to erase the knowledge of their own identity”.

By scanned by Open Clip Art Library user Johnny Automatic – http://openclipart.org/detail/168137/head-scratcher-by-johnny_automatic, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=18732522

What gnaws at the heart and gets on the nerves

This inspired title clearly took some thinking to conjure. It is on the subject of transthyretin-related amyloidosis (ATTR), a hereditary disorder that equally maims the heart and the brain. Typical features are small fiber neuropathy, autonomic neuropathy, and ventricular hypertrophy. And the treatment, incidentally, requires transplanting a third organ, the liver.

Amyloidosis, Node, Congo Red. Ed Uthman on Flickr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/euthman/377559787

Hand up! Yawn and raise your arm

Now here is a title to pique anyone’s neurological curiosity. It is about a peculiar disorder, parakinesia brachialis oscitans. There is really no cat to be let out of the bag here; the paper’s abstract reveals all. In some cases of hemiplegia, the abstract says, yawning is associated with involuntary raising of the paralysed arm”. Read all about it!

By Joseph Ducreux – MQG0zXDvoSnYDg at Google Cultural Institute maximum zoom level, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=22178664

A sleep medicine medical school curriculum: time for us to wake up

This simple but catchy title is an excellent play on words. It is clearly about the contrariness of the acts of sleep and waking in one headline. This editorial is more than just a catchy title; it is a strong call to action!

Wake up! Simon Bleasdale on Flickr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/simonbleasdale/9562433956

Burnout in neurology: extinguishing the embers and rekindling the joy in practice

It takes great imagination to come up with a title that contains burnout, embers and kindling. And the result is catchy. Burnout is a serious issue that threatens neurological practice, and this editorial flags the concern very forcefully: “the message for all is clear: medicine must identify the root causes of burnout, and more importantly, put the joy back in medicine. It is time to see the light!

Burnout! Dennis Skley on Flickr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/dskley/14692471997

Warts and all: Fingolimod and unusual HPV-associated lesions

Probably not the catchiest title one could come up with, but it is catchy enough to attract attention. The title refers to fingolimod, the multiple sclerosis drug which predisposes to treatment-resistant warts. Simple verruca is bad enough, but the human papilloma virus (HPV) which causes it happens to trigger more sinister diseases: cervical and anogenital cancer. Therefore, with fingolimod, we must pay attention to warts and all!

Human Papillomavirus (HPV) in Head and Neck Cancer. NIH Image Gallery on Flickr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/nihgov/29990958966

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Do you have any catchy titles up your sleeves? Do leave a comment.

What has fibromyalgia to do with the nervous system?

Most neurologists would perish the thought that fibromyalgia has anything to do with the nervous system. Any mention of it would induce sighs and tut tuts. There is however emerging evidence linking fibromyalgia to dysfunctional central pain processing. A prominent advocate of this is anaesthesiology professor Daniel Clauw.

Pain map. vaXzine on Flikr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/vaxzine/2642346629
Pain map. vaXzine on Flikr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/vaxzine/2642346629

Another rheumatologist, Manuel Martinez-Lavin, adds another neurological perspective to fibromyalgia: the association with sympathetic hyperactivity. He makes the very plausible argument that sympathetic hyperactivity would explain the frequent association of fibromyalgia with symptoms such as anxiety, insomnia, and irritable bowel.

By BruceBlaus. When using this image in external sources it can be cited as:Blausen.com staff. "Blausen gallery 2014". Wikiversity Journal of Medicine. DOI:10.15347/wjm/2014.010. ISSN 20018762. - Own work, CC BY 3.0, Link
By BruceBlaus. When using this image in external sources it can be cited as:Blausen.com staff. “Blausen gallery 2014“. Wikiversity Journal of Medicine. DOI:10.15347/wjm/2014.010. ISSN 20018762. – Own work, CC BY 3.0, Link

Martinez-Laviz is also involved in pushing the possible link between fibromyalgia and small fiber neuropathy. This comes from studies of small nerve fibers in the cornea. A recent article in the journal Pain supports this. The title, Objective evidence that small-fiber polyneuropathy underlies some illnesses currently labeled as fibromyalgia, does appear to give credibility to the association.

"Vasculitic neuropathy - plastics - intermed mag" by Nephron - Own work. Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Commons.
Vasculitic neuropathy – plastics – intermed mag” by NephronOwn work. Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Commons.

 

These findings are all pointing to a new paradigm of fibromyalgia. Perhaps neurologists shouldn’t dismiss fibromyalgia too quickly!

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The art of spinning catchy titles

How often is one turned off by a paper with a very convoluted or poorly worded title. One example I came across is The dangerousness of persons with the Othello syndrome. There are many other examples out there.

Fair use, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=1629138
Fair use, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=1629138

 

The focus here is however on articles with titles that not only reflect the topic, but play wonderfully with the words. This paper from Neurology is a classical example: Normal pressure hydrocephalus: how often does the diagnosis hold water?

 

By Vimont, Engelmann /Scan by NLM - National Library of Medicine (Call No. BF V765t 1835 OV2), Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=3750904
By Vimont, Engelmann /Scan by NLM – National Library of Medicine (Call No. BF V765t 1835 OV2), Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=3750904

 

What about this catchy title on absence epilepsy from Epilepsy Currents– The current state of absence epilepsy: can we have your attention?

 

What about this, alluding to the energy production role of mitochondria, from the Journal of Internal Medicine:  Batteries not included: diagnosis and management of mitochondrial disease. Surely alluding to the energy-generating function of mitochondria.

Vintage Arizona State University mitochondrial model. Gregory Han on Flikr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/typefiend/6819392279
Vintage Arizona State University mitochondrial model. Gregory Han on Flikr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/typefiend/6819392279

And this one is from Acta Neuropathologica Communications titled The prion hypothesis in Parkinson’s disease: Braak to the future. This is a reference to the Braak hypothesis which describes the spread of Parkinson’s disease pathology across the brain over time. Could prion diseases be responsible for Parkinson’s disease? For a clue, see my blog post, What are the links between prion diseases and parkinsonian disorders.

By Visanji, Naomi P., Patricia L. Brooks, Lili-Naz Hazrati, and Anthony E. Lang. - Visanji, Naomi P., Patricia L. Brooks, Lili-Naz Hazrati, and Anthony E. Lang. “The Prion Hypothesis in Parkinson’s Disease: Braak to the Future.” Acta Neuropathologica Communications 1, no. 1 (May 8, 2013): 2. doi:10.1186/2051-5960-1-2. http://www.actaneurocomms.org/content/1/1/2., CC BY 2.5, Link
By Visanji, Naomi P., Patricia L. Brooks, Lili-Naz Hazrati, and Anthony E. Lang. – Visanji, Naomi P., Patricia L. Brooks, Lili-Naz Hazrati, and Anthony E. Lang. “The Prion Hypothesis in Parkinson’s Disease: Braak to the Future.” Acta Neuropathologica Communications 1, no. 1 (May 8, 2013): 2. doi:10.1186/2051-5960-1-2. http://www.actaneurocomms.org/content/1/1/2., CC BY 2.5, Link
And from the journal Neurology again comes Blowing the whistle on sports concussions: will the risk of dementia change the game?  This, of course, is to do with the increasing recognition that repeated head injuries in athletes result in chronic traumatic encephalopathy. But is the sporting listening? You may wish to revisit my previous blog post on this, Will Smith and chronic traumatic encephalopathy.
football-1501700_1280
And from Brain comes this commentary titled Seizure prediction: making mileage on the long and winding road. It is not yet open access, and the synopsis doesn’t let the cat out of the bag. It is difficult therefore to establish what links the catchy title to the text. But it is still a work of art.
landscape-690588_1920

And finally, from Muscle and Nerve, comes Small fiber neuropathy: getting bigger! This is a review article highlighting the growing problem of a disorder with a self-deprecating name. Time to take notice!

By Dan Bennett - Flickr: marmaduke, CC BY 2.0, Link
By Dan BennettFlickr: marmaduke, CC BY 2.0, Link

Perhaps you have a few examples of your own to share.

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