15 more creative and catchy neurology headlines for 2019

Regular visitors to this blog know that we love catchy article titles. It is always heartwarming to see how some authors create imaginative and inventive headlines. This skill involves the ability to play with words, and the capacity to be double-edged. This is why this blog keeps a lookout for fascinating neurology titles. And in line with this tradition, and in no particular order of inventiveness, here are 15 more catchy neurology titles!

By Andrikkos – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=33725735

15. Who do they think we are? Public perceptions of psychiatrists and psychologists

This paper, for some unfathomable reason, set out to ask if the public knows the difference between what psychiatrists and psychologists actually do. And the authors discovered that “there is a lack of clarity in the public mind about our roles”. More worryingly, or reassuringly (depending on your perspective), they also found out that “psychologists were perceived as friendlier and having a better rapport“. Not earth-shattering discoveries, but what a great title!

By Laurens van Lieshout – Own work, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=2059674

14. OCT as a window to the MS brain: the view becomes slightly clearer

Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a cool tool which measures the thickness of the retinal fiber layer (RFL). And it has the habit of popping its head up in many neurological specialties. In this case, the specialty is multiple sclerosis, and the subject is how OCT influences its diagnosis and surveillance. Surely a window into the brain is easier to achieve than one into the soul.

Optical coherence tomography of my retina. Brewbooks on Flickr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/brewbooks/8463332137

13. A little man of some importance 

The homonculus is the grotesque representation of the body on the surface or cortex of the brain. This paper reviews how formidable neurosurgeons such as Wilder Penfield worked out the disproportionate dimensions of this diminutive but influential man. He (always a man for some reason) has giant hands, a super-sized mouth, very small legs, and a miniature trunk. The clever brain doesn’t readily allocate its resources to large body parts that perform no complex functions! But be warned, this article is no light-weight reading!

The Homunculus in Crystal Palace (Moncton). Mark Blevis on Flickr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/electricsky/1298772544

12. Brain-focussed ultrasound: what’s the “FUS” all about? 

This title is a play on words around MR-guided focussed ultrasound surgery (MRgFUS), an emerging technique for treating disorders such as essential tremor and Parkinson’s disease (PD). This review looks at the controversial fuss that this technique has evoked.

By Luis Lima89989 – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=19162929

11. The Masks of Identities: Who’s Who? Delusional Misidentification Syndromes

This paper explores the interesting subject of delusional misidentification syndromes (DMSs). The authors argue that few concepts in psychiatry can be as confusing as DMSs. And they did an excellent job of clearing our befuddlement around delusions such as Capgras and Fregoli. Very apt title, very interesting read.

no identity. HaPe-Gera on Flickr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/hape_gera/2929195528

 

10. Waking up to sleeping sickness.

This title belongs to a review of trypanosomiasis, aka sleeping sickness. It is a superb play on words, one that evokes several levels of meaning. It is simple and yet complex at the same time. Great imagination.

https://picryl.com/media/the-sleeping-sickness-gordon-ross

09. Brains and Brawn: Toxoplasma Infections of the Central Nervous System and Skeletal Muscle

This paper discusses two parts of nervous system that are affected by toxoplasmosis. Playing on the symbolic  contradiction between intellect and strength, the authors show how toxoplasmosis is an ecumenical abuser: it metes out the same fate to both brain and brawn.

Brain vs. Brawn. Yau Hoong Tang on Flickr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/tangyauhoong/4474921735

08. Shedding light on photophobia

A slightly paradoxical title this one. Ponder on it just a little more! And then explore the excellent paper shedding light on a condition that is averse to light.

Photophobia (light sensitivity). Joana Roja on Flickr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/cats_mom/2772386028/

07. No laughing matter: subacute degeneration of the spinal cord due to nitrous oxide inhalation

Nitrous oxide, or laughing gas, is now “the seventh most commonly used recreational drug”. But those who pop it do so oblivious of the risk of subacute combined degeneration. This damage to the upper spinal cord results from nitrous oxide-induced depletion of Vitamin B1 (thiamine). Not a laughing matter at all!

Empty Laughing Gas Canisters. Promo Cymru on Flickr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/promocymru/18957223365

06. To scan or not to scan: DaT is the question

Dopamine transport (DaT) scan is a useful brain imaging tests that helps to support the diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease and other disorders which disrupt the dopamine pathways in the brain. It is particularly helpful in ruling out mimics of Parkinson’s disease such as essential tremor. When to request a DaT scan is however a tricky question in practice. This paper, with its Shakespearean twist, looks at the reliability of DaT scans.

Dopamine. John Lester on Flickr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/pathfinderlinden/211882099

05. TauBI or not TauBI: what was the question?

It should be no surprise if Shakespeare rears his head more than once in this blog post. Not when the wordsmith is such a veritable source of inspiration for those struggling to invent catchy titles. This paper looks at taupathy, a neurodegeneration as tragic as Hamlet. It particularly comments on an unusual taupathy, one induced by traumatic brain injury. Curious.

By Lafayette Photo, London – This image is available from the United States Library of Congress‘s Prints and Photographs divisionunder the digital ID cph.3g06529.This tag does not indicate the copyright status of the attached work. A normal copyright tag is still required. See Commons:Licensing for more information., Public Domain, Link

04. Mind the Brain: Stroke Risk in Young Adults With Coarctation of the Aorta

What better way to call attention to a serious complication than a catchy title like this one. This paper highlights the neurological complications of coarctation of the aorta, a serious congenital cardiovascular disease. And the key concerns here are the risks of stroke and cerebral aneurysms. Cardiologists, mind the brain!

Own work assumed (based on copyright claims)., Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=803943

03. Diabetes and Parkinson disease: a sweet spot?

This paper reviews the unexpected biochemical links between diabetes and Parkinson’s disease. And this relationship is assuming a rather large dimension. Why, for example, are there so many insulin receptors in the power house of Parkinson’s disease, the substantia nigra? A sweet curiosity.

Insulin bubble. Sprogz on Flickr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/sprogz/5606839532

02. PFO closure for secondary stroke prevention: is the discussion closed?

The foraman ovale is a physiological hole-in-the-heart which should close up once a baby is born. A patent foramen ovale (PFO) results when this hole refuses to shut up. PFOs enable leg clots to traverse the heart and cause strokes in the brain. This paper reviews the evidence that surgically closing PFOs prevents stroke. Common sense says it should, but science demands proof. And the authors assert that they have it all nicely tied up. Hmmm.

By Kjetil Lenes – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=3705964

01. Closure of patent foramen ovale in “cryptogenic” stroke: Has the story come to an end?

Not to be beaten in the catchy title race is another brilliant PFO review article. Why do I feel the answer here is ‘no’? This is science after all.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/fliegender/293340835

 

Masitinib, a breakthrough drug shattering neurology boundaries

In the process of writing a blog post on the research findings altering neurological practice, my sight fell on the drug, Masitinib. I was completely unaware of this tyrosine kinase inhibitor, one of the promising drugs in the fight against multiple sclerosis (MS). We are likely to hear a lot more about Masitinib in MS in the coming months.

By Zeldj - Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, Link
By ZeldjOwn work, CC BY-SA 4.0, Link

Masitinib is however not flexing its muscles just in neuro-inflammation. On the contrary, it is seeking laurels far afield, in the realm of neuro-degeneration. I was indeed pleasantly surprised to find that researchers are studying the impact of Masitinib on two other horrible scourges of neurology. The first report I came across is the favourable outcome of a phase 3 trial of Masitinib in motor neurone disease (MND) or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The drug reportedly ‘reached its primary objectives‘ of efficacy and safety. In this trial, Masitinib was used as an add-on to Riluzole, the established MND drug. It’s all jolly collaborative at this stage, but who knows what threat Masitinib will pose to Riluzole in future! You may read a bit more on Masitinib and MND in this piece from Journal of Neuroinflammation.

By Capilano1 - Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, Link
By Capilano1Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, Link

The second report I came across is the potential of Masitinib in the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). This is at the phase 2 trial stage, and already showing very good outcomes in people with mild to moderate AD. Masitinib was used as an add-on drug to the conventional AD medications Memantine, Donepezil, Galantamine and Rivastigmine. These drugs can therefore rest comfortably on their thrones…at least for now! You can read a bit more on Masitinib and AD in this article from Expert Review of Neurotherapeutics.

Alzheimer's Disease. Hamza Butt on Flikr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/141735806@N08/28007367952
Alzheimer’s Disease. Hamza Butt on Flikr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/141735806@N08/28007367952

The question however remains, why should one drug work well on such disparate diseases? I know, this feels like deja vu coming shortly after my last blog post titled Alzheimers disease and its promising links with diabetes. In that post I looked at the promise of the diabetes drug, Liraglutide, in the treatment of Alzheimers disease. I have however also reviewed this type of cross-boundary activity of drugs in my older posts, Will riluzole really be good for cerebellar ataxia? and old drugs, new roles? Perhaps Masitinib is another pointer that, as we precisely define the cause of diseases, they will turn out to be merely different manifestations of the same pathology. Food for thought.

Benjah-bmm27 assumed. Own work assumed (based on copyright claims). Public Domain, Link
Benjah-bmm27 assumed. Own work assumed (based on copyright claims). Public Domain, Link

 

As I said, this wasn’t the post I set out to write. So watch out for my next blog post, the major research outcomes altering neurological practice.

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Alzheimers disease and its promising links with diabetes

In the excellent book, The Innovators Prescription, the authors predict that precision medicine will replace intuitive medicine, and diseases will be defined by their underlying metabolic mechanisms, and not by the organs they affect, or the symptoms they produce. Clayton Christensen and colleagues argue that this precise definition of diseases will lead to more effective treatments. But they also show that precision medicine will show that many different diseases actually share the same underlying metabolic derangements. Many disparate diseases will therefore turn out to be just mere manifestations of the same metabolic disease.

Precision Medicine Conference at Harvard. Isaac Kohane on Flikr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/52786697@N00/16892093678
Precision Medicine Conference at Harvard. Isaac Kohane on Flikr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/52786697@N00/16892093678

A clear indication that precision medicine will blur the boundaries between diseases is the recent suggestion that the anti-diabetes drug Liraglutide may help to treat Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Liraglutide is a long-acting glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist which is effective in type 2 diabetes, a condition which is worlds apart from Alzheimer’s disease. So far removed from each other, it would be easy to dismiss any links as tenuous. But the headlines were emphatic: Drug used to treat diabetes could cure Alzheimer’s, and Diabetes drug could influence brain activity in Alzheimer’s. 

diabetes-1326964_1280

It is however no hype: there is evidence that Liraglutide may benefit people with Alzheimer’s disease. Trials in animal have shown that Liraglutide promotes neuronal survival, learning and memory, and reduces neuroinflammation and amyloid plaque formation. One such study is titled Prophylactic liraglutide treatment prevents amyloid plaque deposition, chronic inflammation and memory impairment in APP/PS1 mice. Beyond animals, small human trials have shown that Liraglutide improves brain glucose metabolism in Alzheimer’s disease.

beta-amyloid-plaques. vestque on Flikr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/35049835@N00/16867428955
beta-amyloid-plaques. vestque on Flikr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/35049835@N00/16867428955

Why should Liraglutide work so well in both diabetes and Alzheimer’s, diseases with apparently different pathologies? The answer lies in insulin resistance, the underlying mechanism of type 2 of diabetes; there is now evidence that insulin resistance contributes to dementia. If this is the case, Liraglutide, by improving glucose metabolism, could potentially treat both diabetes and Alzheimer’s disease.

Sugar Cubes. David Pace on Flikr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/63723146@N08/7164573186
Sugar Cubes. David Pace on Flikr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/63723146@N08/7164573186

To explore this potential further, there is now a large multicentre trial exploring the real benefit of Liraglutide in Alzheimer’s disease. Titled Evaluating Liraglutide in Alzheimer’s Disease or ELAD, it is recruiting people with mild disease, aged between 50-85 years old, and who do not have diabetes. As they say, watch this space!

Brain Aging. Kalvicio de las Nieves on Flikr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/118316968@N08/19444505382
Brain Aging. Kalvicio de las Nieves on Flikr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/118316968@N08/19444505382

Going back to the subject of precision medicine, why not visit my other blog, The Doctors Bookshelf where I will soon be reviewing The Innovators Prescription

What unconventional stroke risk factors are out there?

Stroke is a terrible disease. It comes unexpectedly out of the blue, strikes quickly, and leaves devastation in its wake.

Ischemic stroke. NIH Image Gallery on Flikr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/nihgov/24964721940
Ischemic stroke. NIH Image Gallery on Flikr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/nihgov/24964721940

 

Stroke treatment is advancing in leaps and bounds, but the best approach remains preventative. We are all aware of the need to guard against the conventional harbingers of stroke: hypertension, high cholesterol, diabetes mellitus, and smoking. We are also aware of the benefits of a healthy diet and exercise.

There are of course stroke risk factors we can do nothing about: age is one, and there is of course a long list of genetic stroke risk factors.

DNA rendering. ynse on Flikr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/ynse/542370154
DNA rendering. ynse on Flikr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/ynse/542370154

 

Just as we are getting used to monitoring our blood pressures and heading to the park, some neurologists are bent on making our task a little bit harder. It’s no longer enough to flex those biceps or stamp out that stub; we now have to take notice of unconventional stoke risk factors. The first of these is infection.

3D model of influenza virus
3D model of influenza virus

This paper in Neurology titled Infection, vaccination, and childhood arterial ischemic stroke establishes the association between infection and stroke. The authors showed that 18% of children with stroke had an infection in the preceding week, compared to only 3% of those that did not have a stroke. Adults should not count themselves lucky going by another paper in the journal Vaccine titled Influenza vaccination and risk of stroke: Self-controlled case-series study. Both papers reassure us that immunisation helps to counter the stroke hazard of infections- one strong reason not to skip the next round of flu vaccinations.

By LaurMG. - Cropped from "File:Frustrated man at a desk.jpg"., CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=20367001
By LaurMG. – Cropped from “File:Frustrated man at a desk.jpg“., CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=20367001

 

Beyond infection come more bizarre unconventional stroke risk factors. We have always known that stress is no good; now we have some evidence to back this up. Just take the following factors now linked to stroke:

Add depression to this and you have a dangerous trio.

 

By BruceBlaus - Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=44968538
By BruceBlaus – Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=44968538

 

Some medical risk factors are difficult to relate with stroke. Take for example

By M. Adiputra - Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=11602220
By M. AdiputraOwn work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=11602220

 

Another risk factor to watch out for is air pollution. And to cap it off, being bilingual improves the chances of recovery from stroke. How unconventional is that!

Addendum

And straight off the press, you can now add sleep apnoea and insomnia to the list of stroke risk factors.

Is neurology research finally breaking the resolve of MND?

Motor neurone disease (MND) is, to say the least, dreadful. It also doesn’t help that the terminology neurologists use adds to the distress. West of the Atlantic, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) means MND but goes eastwards and it is only a subtype of MND. Thankfully, for most Americans at least, there is no confusion; it is simply Lou Gehrig disease.

By Goudey [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
By Goudey [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

MND however remains a conundrum for neurologists who are struggling to solve its puzzling riddles. MND researchers continue to toil and sweat, but their efforts are bearing fruits. Take for example the great strides that established the link between MND and the C9ORF72 gene. What are the promising prospects in the world of MND? Here are some.

Associations: Thiamine deficiency and Diabetes 

By Jynto [CC0], via Wikimedia Commons
By Jynto [CC0], via Wikimedia Commons
Should we be on the lookout for thiamine deficiency in patients with MND? This question is prompted by an article in the JNNP which shows an unexpectedly high frequency of laboratory, but not clinical, thiamine deficiency. Titled Thiamine deficiency in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, the paper reported thiamine deficiency in about 28% of subjects with MND. The authors did not impute any causal association, and there is nothing to suggest that replenishing the thiamine improved outcomes. It is still worth thinking about because people with MND, as the paper emphasised, are at risk of thiamine deficiency.

Another reported association, more difficult to fathom, is the one between MND and diabetes mellitus. The report in the European Journal of Neurology is titled Association between diabetes and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in Sweden. Why am I sceptical?

Risk factor: Human endogenous retrovirus K (HERV K) 

Retrovirus capsid. A J Cann on Flikr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/ajc1/3269017701/in/photostream/
Retrovirus capsid. A J Cann on Flikr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/ajc1/3269017701/in/photostream/

The cause for MND remains unknown. Risk factors however abound such as smoking and other environmental risk factors. You may now add human endogenous retrovirus K (HERV K) to that list. This is according to a recent paper in Science Translational Medicine titled Human endogenous retrovirus-K contributes to motor neuron disease. The authors report that HERV K is activated in some people with MND, and it is the envelope proteins that cause damage to tissues. The US National Institutes of Health (NIH) think this is an important development, and it released a press statement titled Dormant viral genes may awaken to cause ALS. Scary! Is this important, or just another risk factor? Only time will tell.

Pathology: Neuromuscular junction inflammation 

By Elliejellybelly13 - Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=40798702
By Elliejellybelly13Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=40798702

This sounds almost sacrilegious- the thought that inflammation may really play a role in MND. And at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ), not the anterior horn cells. Well, some researchers are ready to commit blasphemy; publishing in Experimental Neurology, the authors showed evidence of inflammation in the muscles and NMJs of rat models of MND. They went further to show that injecting a growth factor called GDNF reduced this inflammation. Do I perceive a potential treatment pathway? Read all about it if you dare, its titled Macrophage-mediated inflammation and glial response in the skeletal muscle of a rat model of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

Treatment target: TDP-43 protein 

By Emw (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 or GFDL], via Wikimedia Commons
By Emw (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 or GFDL], via Wikimedia Commons
Will MND ever be a curable disease? A big question, but this is the vision of all the hard-working researchers in this field. What are the prospects for a cure? One group of researchers believe the answer is in preventing misfolding of TDP-43, the protein that plays an important role in MND. They set out their case in an article published in Neurotherapeutics titled TDP-43 Proteinopathy and ALS: Insights into Disease Mechanisms and Therapeutic Targets. And don’t worry, its free access. The bold abstract says it all: “we present the case that preventing the misfolding of TDP-43 and/or enhancing its clearance represents the most important target for effectively treating ALS”. The proof of the pudding….

Diagnostic test: Nerve ultrasound

By Oleg Alexandrov - self-made with MATLAB, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=3036844
By Oleg Alexandrov – self-made with MATLAB, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=3036844

Making the diagnosis of MND is not always (make that is hardly ever) straightforward. In the early stages, symptoms are vague, and clinical signs are non-specific. MND also has many mimics. One of such mimics is multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN). To distinguish this and other mimics from MND, neurologist rely on a test called nerve conduction study (NCS). Even this however is not always helpful.

Researchers have now reported that ultrasound may be more sensitive in distinguishing MND from MMN. Another sacrilegious thought! They published their paper in Journal of Neurology with a rather long title: Nerve ultrasound in the differentiation of multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with predominant lower motor neuron disease (ALS/LMND). Could the diagnosis of MND really be this simple? I am concerned that there were only 16 subjects with MND in the study, all from one centre. Perhaps a randomised, multi-centre, trial will come to the rescue?

Diagnostic biomarker: Brain iron deposition 

By Oleg Alexandrov - self-made with MATLAB, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=3036844
By Oleg Alexandrov – self-made with MATLAB, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=3036844

Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is not a test neurologist rely upon to make the diagnosis of MND. Not anymore it seems, going by an article in American Journal of Neuroradiology. The paper is titled A Potential Biomarker in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis. In the article, the authors assessed the amount of iron deposition in the brains of people with MND using the MRI techniques called SWI and DTI. Their findings suggest that the amount of iron in the motor cortex and motor tracts of the brain is a good guide to the presence of MND. If confirmed, this technique will help to reduce the long time it often takes before neurologists confirm their suspicions of MND to patients and their families.

Prognostic biomarker: Neurofilament light chain (NfL) 

Neurofilament and MBP. Dan O'Shea on Flikr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/dan_oshea/4079086197
Neurofilament and MBP. Dan O’Shea on Flikr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/dan_oshea/4079086197

The outcome of MND, poor as it often is, varies quite widely. This is influenced by several factors such as the type of MND, use of the medicine riluzole, and multidisciplinary care. New research suggests that neurofilament light chain (NfL) may be a more sensitive marker of prognosis. This is reported in an article published in Neurology titled Neurofilament light chain: A prognostic biomarker in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The authors demonstrated that patients with MND have much higher levels of NfL than those without the disease. Furthermore, subjects with MND who had the highest levels at the onset had a higher mortality hazard ratio. I think I know what that means.

Prognostic scale: ALS-MITOS predictive system

A paper in the JNNP has proposed a new predictive system for MND called ALS-MITOS, reportedly better than the more familiar ALSFRS-R. The report is titled The MITOS system predicts long-term survival in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Most practicing neurologists wouldn’t know the difference because they don’t to use such predictive systems. But MND researchers would be licking their lips at the prospect of a better measure of disease progression; it will make it much easier for them to show that their interventions really do work!

Treatment: Copper 

By Native_Copper_Macro_Digon3.jpg: “Jonathan Zander (Digon3)"derivative work: Materialscientist (talk) - Native_Copper_Macro_Digon3.jpg, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=7223304
By Native_Copper_Macro_Digon3.jpg: “Jonathan Zander (Digon3)”derivative work: Materialscientist (talk) – Native_Copper_Macro_Digon3.jpg, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=7223304

There are >100 mutations in the superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD-1), a gene known to cause MND. SOD-1 is an enzyme that binds both copper and zinc, and when defective it results in mutant copper (don’t worry, I’m just finding this out myself). Acting on this hypothesis, researchers came up with a crafty way of delivering normal copper into the central nervous system of  mice modelled with SOD-1 MND. Publishing in Neurobiology of Disease, the authors showed how they achieved this with CuATSM, a chemical that contains copper and currently used for PET scans. CuATSM is readily transported into the nervous system, delivering its copper as it does so.

The paper has a rather cumbersome title: Copper delivery to the CNS by CuATSM effectively treats motor neuron disease in SODG93A mice co-expressing the Copper-Chaperone-for-SOD. The result is however anything but. The technique extended the lives of the mice by an average of 18 months. Unbelievable it seems. Any doubts however vanished when, on stopping the treatment, the mice died within 3 months. The finding is exciting enough for Eureka Alert to run the story with the headline New therapy halts progression of Lou Gehrig’s disease in mice. ‘Halt’ sounds very much like ‘cure’, but lets put the brakes on and wait for confirmation in human trials .

Treatment: Gene therapy

Gene_therapy. 1Droid JamLos on Flikr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/jamlos/2734418031
Gene_therapy. 1Droid JamLos on Flikr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/jamlos/2734418031

Every recalcitrant disease is today threatened with gene therapy. Considering it has a long list of genetic risk factors, why should MND be any different? Research taking steps in this direction is therefore long overdue. One such step was published in Gene Therapy and is titled Healthy and diseased corticospinal motor neurons are selectively transduced upon direct AAV2-2 injection into the motor cortex. The authors report that they successfully transduced motor nerves of mice models of MND. In doing so they have set the stage for gene therapy in MND. I don’t claim to understand it all, but it sounds very much like they have set the ball rolling. Promising.

Treatment: Stem cell therapy

By Ryddragyn at English Wikipedia - Transferred from en.wikipedia to Commons., Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=2148036
By Ryddragyn at English Wikipedia – Transferred from en.wikipedia to Commons., Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=2148036

Where gene therapy goes, stem cell therapy seems to follow. And this comes from JAMA Neurology with a classic unwieldy academic title: Safety and Clinical Effects of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Secreting Neurotrophic Factor Transplantation in Patients With Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis. The content isn’t any easier to interpret, and I will not pretend I get it at all. I comfort myself that it’s all at the ‘open-label, proof of concept‘ stage, and only the very brainy brains need to delve further. But it seems to offer hope.

By Jim Campbell/Aero-News Network - http://www.flickr.com/photos/39735679@N00/475109138/ / http://mediaarchive.ksc.nasa.gov/detail.cfm?mediaid=31873, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=3655144
By Jim Campbell/Aero-News Network – http://www.flickr.com/photos/39735679@N00/475109138/ / http://mediaarchive.ksc.nasa.gov/detail.cfm?mediaid=31873, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=3655144

 

The sky is surely the limit. Here are a couple of other headlines if you wish to explore further:

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Does diabetes protect from MND?

Motor neurone disease (MND) is a dreadful condition, one of the most difficult a neurologist comes across. And the impact on the patient and their families is quite profound. News from the MND world is hardly ever cheering, and this is reflected by my recent post which suggests that formaldehyde possibly predisposes to motor neurone disease. Any good news, no matter how far-fetched, is therefore welcome.

Motor neuron on a muscle cell. Matt Brown on Flikr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/londonmatt/5869934793
Motor neuron on a muscle cell. Matt Brown on Flikr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/londonmatt/5869934793

And this is probably as flimsy as they come; a recent paper in JAMA Neurology suggests that type 2 (and not type 1) diabetes mellitus may reduce the risk of MND. This is a small trial in a Danish population. This is clearly not a case of choosing between the devil and the deep blue sea. It may be cheering news for people with diabetes, but more importantly it may be a clue for researchers looking for a cure for MND.

By International Diabetes Foundation - http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:World_Diabetes_Day_logo.svg, Public Domain, Link
By International Diabetes Foundation – http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:World_Diabetes_Day_logo.svg, Public Domain, Link

Talking of MND cures, there is some more hopeful news for people with MND. Researchers in Sheffield are working on potential genetic treatment for people with the SOD 1 gene mutation, an important cause of hereditary MND. This SOD1-targeted gene therapy is essentially gene silencing, and this is still in early stages. But it is hope all the same-the future is not all doom and gloom.

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