What do neurology information seekers really want?

A few months ago, Neurochecklists set out to discover how people go about searching for neurology information. We therefore carried out an online survey of neurology information users. We asked 10 critical questions about the who, what, wherewhy, and how of neurology information quest.

https://pixabay.com/en/questions-who-what-how-why-where-1328465/

 

We asked these question specifically to guide a major Neurochecklists upgrade. This knowledge is, after all, critical for a website which has set out to be the best source of clear, concise, and comprehensive neurology information. But we needed help to know what really matters to people when they go foraging for neurology. What do they really want, and how do they go about satisfying their need?

Search Key. GotCredit on Flickr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/gotcredit/32943606783/

 

The response we got was heart-warming; about 190 people answered our online questions. Below are the questions along with the insights we gained from the answers.

Q&A. opensource.com on Flickr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/opensourceway/5556249000

 

Who searches for neurology information?

More than 50% of our responders were consultant neurologists, and about 15% were medical consultantsNeurology trainees constituted about 7%. The range of users is however quite broad, including nurses, surgeons, medical students, and patients! See the breakdown in the pie chart below:

Insight: There are diverse neurology information seekers!

How often do we forage for neurology information?

Neurology information is in high demand, with >50% of responders seeking information at least once a day, and >80% at least once a week. Below is the breakdown:

Insight: There is a huge craving for neurology information!

Where do we go when we need neurology information?

Online websites are by far the most popular source of quick neurology information, accounting for >50% of responses. This is followed by journals which account for just over 25% of responses. Very few responders access textbooks, handbooks, downloadable apps or online videos. Below is the breakdown:

Insight: Neurology source information is now mainly online

Where are we when we most crave neurology information?

In a question which allowed multiple answers, the clinic was by far the most common setting for looking up neurology information. We however also have a strong urge for neurology on the ward, and at home! Below is the breakdown:

Insight: The need for neurology information has no boundaries

Why do we access neurology information?

The most frequent reasons responders access neurology information were to answer clinical questions and for personal study. Other reasons were to aid discussions with patients, and to look for relevant references.

Insight: the checklist approach is the best solution

What devices do we use to access neurology information?

In another multiple answer question, responders most often use their phones to access online neurology information. Laptops and desktops are also favoured, but tablets much less so.

Insight: neurology information must be device-compatible

What features do we most favour in an online neurology database?

We asked what features responders most desire in an online neurology database, and the front-runners here are accuracy and currency of information, followed by conciseness, adequacy, ease of navigation, and link to references.

 

Insight: Neurochecklists is on the right track

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We wish to extend our thanks to everybody who took part in the survey, including the many who attempted it after the closing date! We have taken all the responses on board, and we have been working night and day to provide an enhanced Neurochecklists. Watch out for our next blog post to find out the changes we will be launching soon. Neurology seekers, watch this space!

By AnsonloboOwn work, CC BY-SA 4.0, Link