A few more catchy titles from the world of neurology

Here we go again. Neurologists can’t seem to stop spinning them, and we can’t help weaving them into blog posts. If you are late to the game, you may catch up with our previous catchy titles:

The art of spinning catchy titles
The art of spinning catchy neurology headlines
A few more catchy neurology article titles to start the year
15 more creative and catchy neurology headlines for 2019

Now that you are up-to-date, here are 10 more catchy neurology article titles to make your day: 

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Optic neuritis in the diagnosis of MS: more than meets the eye

This article looks at a common symptom of multiple sclerosis (MS), and makes the strong case that we need to do more to diagnose optic neuritis. And it is a very catchy way to make the point.

Optic nerve fron view. Francisco Bengoa on Flickr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/frecuenciamedicafb/7404373518/

The many faces of oral-facial-digital syndrome

This is not something neurologists often come across, but it comes close enough to the specialty. Oral-facial-digital-syndrome is typified by facial deformities, but more importantly, the title makes it clear that it is a syndrome with diverse subtypes. A catchy title for a rare disorder, and this paper reveals all.

Ben Eine – The Strangest Week. Bob Bob on Flickr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/bobaliciouslondon/5196843736

The new concussion in sport guidelines are here. But how do we get them out there?

Not all catchy titles are convoluted. This one is simple but yet very inspired. It refers to the 2016 Consensus Statement on Concussion in Sport. As for all guidelines, it is all well and good to develop them, but a herculean task to get anyone to take notice. It is therefore very ingenious to use a catchy editorial to do the job.

By shgmom56 on Flickr – Originally posted to Flickr as “DSC02769”, CC BY-SA 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=4231521

The great escape: a neuropsychological study of psychogenic amnesia

This is just a case report of fugue state, but it comes with a great title. The perspective of psychological amnesia as an escape is appropriate, and to the point.

By Wassily Kandinski – http://www.abcgallery.com/K/kandinsky/kandinsky73.html, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=2174133

When the past is lost: focal retrograde amnesia

Another one on amnesia, and what a great title. It is a report of 13 cases of focal retrograde amnesia, all typified by loss of autobiographical memory. The amnesia is severe enough in some cases “to erase the knowledge of their own identity”.

By scanned by Open Clip Art Library user Johnny Automatic – http://openclipart.org/detail/168137/head-scratcher-by-johnny_automatic, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=18732522

What gnaws at the heart and gets on the nerves

This inspired title clearly took some thinking to conjure. It is on the subject of transthyretin-related amyloidosis (ATTR), a hereditary disorder that equally maims the heart and the brain. Typical features are small fiber neuropathy, autonomic neuropathy, and ventricular hypertrophy. And the treatment, incidentally, requires transplanting a third organ, the liver.

Amyloidosis, Node, Congo Red. Ed Uthman on Flickr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/euthman/377559787

Hand up! Yawn and raise your arm

Now here is a title to pique anyone’s neurological curiosity. It is about a peculiar disorder, parakinesia brachialis oscitans. There is really no cat to be let out of the bag here; the paper’s abstract reveals all. In some cases of hemiplegia, the abstract says, yawning is associated with involuntary raising of the paralysed arm”. Read all about it!

By Joseph Ducreux – MQG0zXDvoSnYDg at Google Cultural Institute maximum zoom level, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=22178664

A sleep medicine medical school curriculum: time for us to wake up

This simple but catchy title is an excellent play on words. It is clearly about the contrariness of the acts of sleep and waking in one headline. This editorial is more than just a catchy title; it is a strong call to action!

Wake up! Simon Bleasdale on Flickr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/simonbleasdale/9562433956

Burnout in neurology: extinguishing the embers and rekindling the joy in practice

It takes great imagination to come up with a title that contains burnout, embers and kindling. And the result is catchy. Burnout is a serious issue that threatens neurological practice, and this editorial flags the concern very forcefully: “the message for all is clear: medicine must identify the root causes of burnout, and more importantly, put the joy back in medicine. It is time to see the light!

Burnout! Dennis Skley on Flickr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/dskley/14692471997

Warts and all: Fingolimod and unusual HPV-associated lesions

Probably not the catchiest title one could come up with, but it is catchy enough to attract attention. The title refers to fingolimod, the multiple sclerosis drug which predisposes to treatment-resistant warts. Simple verruca is bad enough, but the human papilloma virus (HPV) which causes it happens to trigger more sinister diseases: cervical and anogenital cancer. Therefore, with fingolimod, we must pay attention to warts and all!

Human Papillomavirus (HPV) in Head and Neck Cancer. NIH Image Gallery on Flickr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/nihgov/29990958966

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Do you have any catchy titles up your sleeves? Do leave a comment.

15 more creative and catchy neurology headlines for 2019

Regular visitors to this blog know that we love catchy article titles. It is always heartwarming to see how some authors create imaginative and inventive headlines. This skill involves the ability to play with words, and the capacity to be double-edged. This is why this blog keeps a lookout for fascinating neurology titles. And in line with this tradition, and in no particular order of inventiveness, here are 15 more catchy neurology titles!

By Andrikkos – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=33725735

15. Who do they think we are? Public perceptions of psychiatrists and psychologists

This paper, for some unfathomable reason, set out to ask if the public knows the difference between what psychiatrists and psychologists actually do. And the authors discovered that “there is a lack of clarity in the public mind about our roles”. More worryingly, or reassuringly (depending on your perspective), they also found out that “psychologists were perceived as friendlier and having a better rapport“. Not earth-shattering discoveries, but what a great title!

By Laurens van Lieshout – Own work, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=2059674

14. OCT as a window to the MS brain: the view becomes slightly clearer

Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a cool tool which measures the thickness of the retinal fiber layer (RFL). And it has the habit of popping its head up in many neurological specialties. In this case, the specialty is multiple sclerosis, and the subject is how OCT influences its diagnosis and surveillance. Surely a window into the brain is easier to achieve than one into the soul.

Optical coherence tomography of my retina. Brewbooks on Flickr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/brewbooks/8463332137

13. A little man of some importance 

The homonculus is the grotesque representation of the body on the surface or cortex of the brain. This paper reviews how formidable neurosurgeons such as Wilder Penfield worked out the disproportionate dimensions of this diminutive but influential man. He (always a man for some reason) has giant hands, a super-sized mouth, very small legs, and a miniature trunk. The clever brain doesn’t readily allocate its resources to large body parts that perform no complex functions! But be warned, this article is no light-weight reading!

The Homunculus in Crystal Palace (Moncton). Mark Blevis on Flickr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/electricsky/1298772544

12. Brain-focussed ultrasound: what’s the “FUS” all about? 

This title is a play on words around MR-guided focussed ultrasound surgery (MRgFUS), an emerging technique for treating disorders such as essential tremor and Parkinson’s disease (PD). This review looks at the controversial fuss that this technique has evoked.

By Luis Lima89989 – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=19162929

11. The Masks of Identities: Who’s Who? Delusional Misidentification Syndromes

This paper explores the interesting subject of delusional misidentification syndromes (DMSs). The authors argue that few concepts in psychiatry can be as confusing as DMSs. And they did an excellent job of clearing our befuddlement around delusions such as Capgras and Fregoli. Very apt title, very interesting read.

no identity. HaPe-Gera on Flickr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/hape_gera/2929195528

 

10. Waking up to sleeping sickness.

This title belongs to a review of trypanosomiasis, aka sleeping sickness. It is a superb play on words, one that evokes several levels of meaning. It is simple and yet complex at the same time. Great imagination.

https://picryl.com/media/the-sleeping-sickness-gordon-ross

09. Brains and Brawn: Toxoplasma Infections of the Central Nervous System and Skeletal Muscle

This paper discusses two parts of nervous system that are affected by toxoplasmosis. Playing on the symbolic  contradiction between intellect and strength, the authors show how toxoplasmosis is an ecumenical abuser: it metes out the same fate to both brain and brawn.

Brain vs. Brawn. Yau Hoong Tang on Flickr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/tangyauhoong/4474921735

08. Shedding light on photophobia

A slightly paradoxical title this one. Ponder on it just a little more! And then explore the excellent paper shedding light on a condition that is averse to light.

Photophobia (light sensitivity). Joana Roja on Flickr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/cats_mom/2772386028/

07. No laughing matter: subacute degeneration of the spinal cord due to nitrous oxide inhalation

Nitrous oxide, or laughing gas, is now “the seventh most commonly used recreational drug”. But those who pop it do so oblivious of the risk of subacute combined degeneration. This damage to the upper spinal cord results from nitrous oxide-induced depletion of Vitamin B1 (thiamine). Not a laughing matter at all!

Empty Laughing Gas Canisters. Promo Cymru on Flickr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/promocymru/18957223365

06. To scan or not to scan: DaT is the question

Dopamine transport (DaT) scan is a useful brain imaging tests that helps to support the diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease and other disorders which disrupt the dopamine pathways in the brain. It is particularly helpful in ruling out mimics of Parkinson’s disease such as essential tremor. When to request a DaT scan is however a tricky question in practice. This paper, with its Shakespearean twist, looks at the reliability of DaT scans.

Dopamine. John Lester on Flickr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/pathfinderlinden/211882099

05. TauBI or not TauBI: what was the question?

It should be no surprise if Shakespeare rears his head more than once in this blog post. Not when the wordsmith is such a veritable source of inspiration for those struggling to invent catchy titles. This paper looks at taupathy, a neurodegeneration as tragic as Hamlet. It particularly comments on an unusual taupathy, one induced by traumatic brain injury. Curious.

By Lafayette Photo, London – This image is available from the United States Library of Congress‘s Prints and Photographs divisionunder the digital ID cph.3g06529.This tag does not indicate the copyright status of the attached work. A normal copyright tag is still required. See Commons:Licensing for more information., Public Domain, Link

04. Mind the Brain: Stroke Risk in Young Adults With Coarctation of the Aorta

What better way to call attention to a serious complication than a catchy title like this one. This paper highlights the neurological complications of coarctation of the aorta, a serious congenital cardiovascular disease. And the key concerns here are the risks of stroke and cerebral aneurysms. Cardiologists, mind the brain!

Own work assumed (based on copyright claims)., Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=803943

03. Diabetes and Parkinson disease: a sweet spot?

This paper reviews the unexpected biochemical links between diabetes and Parkinson’s disease. And this relationship is assuming a rather large dimension. Why, for example, are there so many insulin receptors in the power house of Parkinson’s disease, the substantia nigra? A sweet curiosity.

Insulin bubble. Sprogz on Flickr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/sprogz/5606839532

02. PFO closure for secondary stroke prevention: is the discussion closed?

The foraman ovale is a physiological hole-in-the-heart which should close up once a baby is born. A patent foramen ovale (PFO) results when this hole refuses to shut up. PFOs enable leg clots to traverse the heart and cause strokes in the brain. This paper reviews the evidence that surgically closing PFOs prevents stroke. Common sense says it should, but science demands proof. And the authors assert that they have it all nicely tied up. Hmmm.

By Kjetil Lenes – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=3705964

01. Closure of patent foramen ovale in “cryptogenic” stroke: Has the story come to an end?

Not to be beaten in the catchy title race is another brilliant PFO review article. Why do I feel the answer here is ‘no’? This is science after all.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/fliegender/293340835

 

A few more catchy neurology article titles to start the year

The Neurology Lounge is addicted to journal articles whose titles show that a lot of thought and attention went into constructing them. I have reviewed some of these in my previous blog posts titled The Art of Spinning Catchy Titles, and The Art of Spinning Catchy Neurology Headlines. To keep the tradition alive, here are a few more recent catchy titles.

Journal Entry. Joel Montes de Oca on Flikr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/joelmontes/4762384399

Stoop to conquer: preventing stroke and dementia together

This comes from an editorial in Lancet Neurology urging a joint approach to preventing stroke and dementia, a strategy the author calls ‘the lowest hanging fruit in the fight against these two greatest threats to the brain’. He argues that ‘at the moment, the fruit might be hanging too low for our gaze, and we are wrongly fixated on the distant future of Alzheimer’s disease treatment. We might have to stoop to conquer‘.

By Gavarni – Le voleur, n°95, 27 août 1858, page 265. Reproduction d’une gravure extraite des Toquades de Paul Gavarni, éditées par Gabriel de Gonet, Paris 1858., Public Domain, Link

Romberg’s test no longer stands up

This opinion piece in Practical Neurology takes a stab at the age-old neurological test of sensory impairment. Subject are asked to stand up and try to maintain their balance with their eyes shut. The author asserts that this, the Romberg’s test, ‘lacks essential specificity’, ‘risks physical injury’, and is ‘redundant’. He argues that there are much better, and safer, ways of testing for sensory ataxia. There goes an interesting test!

By Mikhail KonininFlickr: Meerkat / At the zoo / Novosibirsk / Siberia / 24.07.2012, CC BY 2.0, Link

Dacrystic seizures: a cry for help

This is from a case report of a 69-year old man in the journal Neurology. He presented with unusual crying spells which turned out to be dacrystic (crying) seizures. This case is eventually revealed to be a case of….sorry, no spoilers. Click on the link to find out.

HeartBroken-Tears are the Baptism of the Soul. Anil Kumar on Flikr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/87128018@N00/139136870

Game of TOR -the target of rapamycin rules four kingdoms

I am no fan of Game of Thrones, but it is an in-your-face television series which provides the setting for this catchy title. The mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway is underlies the pathology of tuberous sclerosis. It is therefore the target of many therapeutic strategies in the form of mTOR inhibitors. And the 4 kingdoms? You have to read the piece from the New England Journal of Medicine…perhaps after you have watched the TV series!

Stack. Wendy on Flikr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/wenzday01/4332780839

Restless legs syndrome: losing sleep over the placebo response

This editorial, also from Neurology, addresses the disturbing report in the same journal warning of the high placebo response of interventions for restless legs syndrome (RLS). The title couldn’t be more apt. 

By Edvard Munch – The Athenaeum: pic, Public Domain, Link

 


…and some not very catchy titles

Unfortunately many neurology titles are not as catchy as the ones above. Many article titles appear to be half-baked and fall short. Here are a few:

And the prize for the silliest title in neurology must go to this paper in the Journal of Neural Transmission that is simply…unreadable!

The art of spinning catchy neurology headlines

The Neurology Lounge is always on the lookout for catchy neurology article titles to adorn its shelves. My previous blog post in this quest was The art of spinning catchy titles.

Since then, there have been quite a few brilliant article titles that have caught my fancy. We must acknowledge the wordsmiths who craftily and meticulously think up these magical headlines; they put in a lot of thought to conjure up the right words to use. The look into their crystal balls to predict the best way to play around with the meanings. With a bit of lexical alchemy, they miraculously come up with the titles that make us do a double-take, but do so with a smile. Below are 9 such catchy titles.

Parkinson’s disease: Oh my gut! 

By The original uploader was Arnavaz at French WikipediaThis image is an old version created by Medium69.Cette image est une ancienne version créée par Medium69.Please credit this : William Crochot – http://www.cancer.gov, Public Domain, Link

This title reflects the science suggesting that Parkinson’s disease originates from the gut. This editorial restates the proposition that α-synuclein starts accumulating in the intestines before migrating, up the vagus nerve, ‘in a prion-like fashion’, to the brain.

Patent foramen ovale and migraine: closing the debate

Medical Illustrations by Patrick Lynch, generated for multimedia teaching projects by the Yale University School of Medicine, Center for Advanced Instructional Media, 1987-2000.

Patent foramen ovale (PFO) is a hole in the heart which connects the upper two heart chambers, or atria. It normally closes after birth, but in some people it persists to cause some grief to cardiologists and neurologists. Whether a PFO causes migraine or not is a long standing contentious issue in Neurology. The authors of this study found no link between migraine and (PFO). The title is brilliant, but the tone of finality is probably premature; I guess this debate is far from over.

Migraine and inhibitory system – I can’t hold it!

Human brain on white background. _DJ_ on Flikr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/flamephoenix1991/8376271918

And still on migraine is this headline grabber. A bit on the basic science spectrum, I quote from the abstract to give you a flavour: ‘This review focuses on recent structural and functional neuroimaging studies that investigated the role of subcortical and cortical structures in modulating nociceptive input in migraine, which outlined the presence of an imbalance between inhibitory and excitatory modulation of pain processing in the disease‘. I would rather stick with the punchy headline myself.

On the nose: olfactory disturbances in patients with transient epileptic amnesia

Big Nose Strikes Again. Bazusa on Flikr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/bazusa/260401471

This research paper establishes a link between transient epileptic amnesia (TEA) and impairment of the sense of smell. TEA continues to surprise, and there is indeed quite a lot to chew in the paper.

Myelitis in neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder: the long and the short of it

By JasonRobertYoungMDOwn work, CC BY-SA 4.0, Link

This is a clear play on the defining feature of neuromyelitis optica (NMO), a long segment of inflammation in the spinal cord. This is what neurologists call longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis (LETM). This is an excellent editorial, worthy of the headline. It emphasises the point that NMO really has no defining features, not even the presence of the ‘defining’ antibody, anti-aquaporin 4- just ask anti-MOG NMO about this

AEDs after ICH: preventing the prophylaxis

By BobjgalindoOwn work, GFDL, Link

How do you prevent a harmful preventative practice?. By a paper with a title that is pure genius of course. The authors of this paper highlight the persisting, anti-guideline, practice of using prophylactic antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in people who have had intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH). The paper rhetorically asks if this has ‘become a habit too difficult to break?’ Not going by this catchy headline!

Paralysis lost: a new cause for a common parasomnia?

Sleepwalking. Gareth on Flikr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/trois-tetes/7240877

Parasomnias are diseases that occur during or related to sleep. This headline is for an editorial on a new parasomnia called anti IgLON5 antibody disorder. This is the subject of my previous blog post titled IgLON5: a new antibody disorder for neurologists. The headline writer here is clearly a fan of John Milton. I however struggled to make the connection between the excellent headline and the subject of the paper. I however presume it relates to the ‘loss of sleep paralysis‘ that accompanies many sleep disorders, including the quintessential parasomnia- REM sleep behaviour disorder (RBD). Excellent title anyway.

Hereditary spastic paraplegia: the pace quickens

By Rawlings, Leo – http://media.iwm.org.uk/iwm/mediaLib//150/media-150073/large.jpgThis is photograph Art.IWM ART LD 6040 from the collections of the Imperial War Museums., Public Domain, Link

With a slightly wicked wit, this headline focuses on the slow walking speed of people with hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP), contrasting this with the increasing research output on the disease. A bit dated I admit, but the paper refers to work which identified the genetic basis of SPG3, one of the commoner HSPs. A lesson in headline writing from the archives you may say.

Cut your losses: spastin mediates branch-specific axon loss

Synapse. Ben Cadet on Flikr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/47814009@N00/2943548161

The headline is brilliant, but the content goes way over my head. It is an editorial on a basic science paper. For the curious and the nerdy, I quote an extract: ‘during synapse elimination in the developing neuromuscular junction, branch-specific microtubule destabilization results in arrested axonal transport and induces axon branch loss. This process is mediated in part by the neurodegeneration-associated, microtubule-severing protein spastin‘. Enough I hear you say. OK, just stick with the headline.

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Do you have any catchy titles-please drop a comment.

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The art of spinning catchy titles

How often is one turned off by a paper with a very convoluted or poorly worded title. One example I came across is The dangerousness of persons with the Othello syndrome. There are many other examples out there.

Fair use, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=1629138
Fair use, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=1629138

 

The focus here is however on articles with titles that not only reflect the topic, but play wonderfully with the words. This paper from Neurology is a classical example: Normal pressure hydrocephalus: how often does the diagnosis hold water?

 

By Vimont, Engelmann /Scan by NLM - National Library of Medicine (Call No. BF V765t 1835 OV2), Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=3750904
By Vimont, Engelmann /Scan by NLM – National Library of Medicine (Call No. BF V765t 1835 OV2), Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=3750904

 

What about this catchy title on absence epilepsy from Epilepsy Currents– The current state of absence epilepsy: can we have your attention?

 

What about this, alluding to the energy production role of mitochondria, from the Journal of Internal Medicine:  Batteries not included: diagnosis and management of mitochondrial disease. Surely alluding to the energy-generating function of mitochondria.

Vintage Arizona State University mitochondrial model. Gregory Han on Flikr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/typefiend/6819392279
Vintage Arizona State University mitochondrial model. Gregory Han on Flikr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/typefiend/6819392279

And this one is from Acta Neuropathologica Communications titled The prion hypothesis in Parkinson’s disease: Braak to the future. This is a reference to the Braak hypothesis which describes the spread of Parkinson’s disease pathology across the brain over time. Could prion diseases be responsible for Parkinson’s disease? For a clue, see my blog post, What are the links between prion diseases and parkinsonian disorders.

By Visanji, Naomi P., Patricia L. Brooks, Lili-Naz Hazrati, and Anthony E. Lang. - Visanji, Naomi P., Patricia L. Brooks, Lili-Naz Hazrati, and Anthony E. Lang. “The Prion Hypothesis in Parkinson’s Disease: Braak to the Future.” Acta Neuropathologica Communications 1, no. 1 (May 8, 2013): 2. doi:10.1186/2051-5960-1-2. http://www.actaneurocomms.org/content/1/1/2., CC BY 2.5, Link
By Visanji, Naomi P., Patricia L. Brooks, Lili-Naz Hazrati, and Anthony E. Lang. – Visanji, Naomi P., Patricia L. Brooks, Lili-Naz Hazrati, and Anthony E. Lang. “The Prion Hypothesis in Parkinson’s Disease: Braak to the Future.” Acta Neuropathologica Communications 1, no. 1 (May 8, 2013): 2. doi:10.1186/2051-5960-1-2. http://www.actaneurocomms.org/content/1/1/2., CC BY 2.5, Link
And from the journal Neurology again comes Blowing the whistle on sports concussions: will the risk of dementia change the game?  This, of course, is to do with the increasing recognition that repeated head injuries in athletes result in chronic traumatic encephalopathy. But is the sporting listening? You may wish to revisit my previous blog post on this, Will Smith and chronic traumatic encephalopathy.
football-1501700_1280
And from Brain comes this commentary titled Seizure prediction: making mileage on the long and winding road. It is not yet open access, and the synopsis doesn’t let the cat out of the bag. It is difficult therefore to establish what links the catchy title to the text. But it is still a work of art.
landscape-690588_1920

And finally, from Muscle and Nerve, comes Small fiber neuropathy: getting bigger! This is a review article highlighting the growing problem of a disorder with a self-deprecating name. Time to take notice!

By Dan Bennett - Flickr: marmaduke, CC BY 2.0, Link
By Dan BennettFlickr: marmaduke, CC BY 2.0, Link

Perhaps you have a few examples of your own to share.

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