Here we go again. Neurologists can’t seem to stop spinning them, and we can’t help weaving them into blog posts. If you are late to the game, you may catch up with our previous catchy titles:

The art of spinning catchy titles
The art of spinning catchy neurology headlines
A few more catchy neurology article titles to start the year
15 more creative and catchy neurology headlines for 2019

Now that you are up-to-date, here are 10 more catchy neurology article titles to make your day: 

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Optic neuritis in the diagnosis of MS: more than meets the eye

This article looks at a common symptom of multiple sclerosis (MS), and makes the strong case that we need to do more to diagnose optic neuritis. And it is a very catchy way to make the point.

Optic nerve fron view. Francisco Bengoa on Flickr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/frecuenciamedicafb/7404373518/

The many faces of oral-facial-digital syndrome

This is not something neurologists often come across, but it comes close enough to the specialty. Oral-facial-digital-syndrome is typified by facial deformities, but more importantly, the title makes it clear that it is a syndrome with diverse subtypes. A catchy title for a rare disorder, and this paper reveals all.

Ben Eine – The Strangest Week. Bob Bob on Flickr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/bobaliciouslondon/5196843736

The new concussion in sport guidelines are here. But how do we get them out there?

Not all catchy titles are convoluted. This one is simple but yet very inspired. It refers to the 2016 Consensus Statement on Concussion in Sport. As for all guidelines, it is all well and good to develop them, but a herculean task to get anyone to take notice. It is therefore very ingenious to use a catchy editorial to do the job.

By shgmom56 on Flickr – Originally posted to Flickr as “DSC02769”, CC BY-SA 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=4231521

The great escape: a neuropsychological study of psychogenic amnesia

This is just a case report of fugue state, but it comes with a great title. The perspective of psychological amnesia as an escape is appropriate, and to the point.

By Wassily Kandinski – http://www.abcgallery.com/K/kandinsky/kandinsky73.html, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=2174133

When the past is lost: focal retrograde amnesia

Another one on amnesia, and what a great title. It is a report of 13 cases of focal retrograde amnesia, all typified by loss of autobiographical memory. The amnesia is severe enough in some cases “to erase the knowledge of their own identity”.

By scanned by Open Clip Art Library user Johnny Automatic – http://openclipart.org/detail/168137/head-scratcher-by-johnny_automatic, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=18732522

What gnaws at the heart and gets on the nerves

This inspired title clearly took some thinking to conjure. It is on the subject of transthyretin-related amyloidosis (ATTR), a hereditary disorder that equally maims the heart and the brain. Typical features are small fiber neuropathy, autonomic neuropathy, and ventricular hypertrophy. And the treatment, incidentally, requires transplanting a third organ, the liver.

Amyloidosis, Node, Congo Red. Ed Uthman on Flickr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/euthman/377559787

Hand up! Yawn and raise your arm

Now here is a title to pique anyone’s neurological curiosity. It is about a peculiar disorder, parakinesia brachialis oscitans. There is really no cat to be let out of the bag here; the paper’s abstract reveals all. In some cases of hemiplegia, the abstract says, yawning is associated with involuntary raising of the paralysed arm”. Read all about it!

By Joseph Ducreux – MQG0zXDvoSnYDg at Google Cultural Institute maximum zoom level, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=22178664

A sleep medicine medical school curriculum: time for us to wake up

This simple but catchy title is an excellent play on words. It is clearly about the contrariness of the acts of sleep and waking in one headline. This editorial is more than just a catchy title; it is a strong call to action!

Wake up! Simon Bleasdale on Flickr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/simonbleasdale/9562433956

Burnout in neurology: extinguishing the embers and rekindling the joy in practice

It takes great imagination to come up with a title that contains burnout, embers and kindling. And the result is catchy. Burnout is a serious issue that threatens neurological practice, and this editorial flags the concern very forcefully: “the message for all is clear: medicine must identify the root causes of burnout, and more importantly, put the joy back in medicine. It is time to see the light!

Burnout! Dennis Skley on Flickr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/dskley/14692471997

Warts and all: Fingolimod and unusual HPV-associated lesions

Probably not the catchiest title one could come up with, but it is catchy enough to attract attention. The title refers to fingolimod, the multiple sclerosis drug which predisposes to treatment-resistant warts. Simple verruca is bad enough, but the human papilloma virus (HPV) which causes it happens to trigger more sinister diseases: cervical and anogenital cancer. Therefore, with fingolimod, we must pay attention to warts and all!

Human Papillomavirus (HPV) in Head and Neck Cancer. NIH Image Gallery on Flickr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/nihgov/29990958966

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Do you have any catchy titles up your sleeves? Do leave a comment.

2 thoughts on “A few more catchy titles from the world of neurology

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