The 20 most viewed blog posts on The Neurology Lounge in 2017

The Neurology Lounge launched in August 2015. And it is now well into its third year2017 has been a busy one for the blog. It has surely been a hard slog. But with  >20,000 visitors. And >30,000 post views. It’s been well worth it.

Man blogging. Mike Licht on Flikr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/notionscapital/5031748151

Most posts have attracted encouraging attention. But some have done so more than others.

Two bloggers. Mike Licht on Flikr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/notionscapital/2744489459

So which were the 20 most viewed blog posts in 2017? Here is the countdown.

John Meynard Keynes blogging. Mike Licht on Flikr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/notionscapital/7276886256

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Join the journey; follow The Neurology Lounge in 2018.

Blogging when the children have gone to bed. Mike Licht on Flikr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/notionscapital/8479881057

10 things we now know about CIDP associated with anti NF155 antibodies

Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is a neurological disorder which causes loss of the fatty myelin covering of large nerves (demyelination). This slows down the speed at which the nerves can transmit electrical impulses. People with CIDP develop weakness and sensory disturbances, but not always in equal measure. CIDP is a pain for the afflicted, and a veritable nightmare for the neurologist.

 

By AjimonthomasOwn work, CC BY-SA 4.0, Link

The diagnostic process for CIDP includes some rather uncomfortable tests such as nerve conduction studies and lumbar puncture (spinal tap). CIDP is however a most rewarding disease to treat because many people respond to immune treatments such as steroids, intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG), or plasma exchange (PE).

PRED SOV 5. Leo Reynolds on Flikr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/lwr/3300474346

The diagnosis of CIDP is however not straightforward. The results of the tests are not always clearcut, and a lot of sifting and sorting goes into nailing the diagnosis. And even when the diagnosis is eventually made, there is a very long list of potential causes of CIDP which often require treatment on their own merit. Worryingly, some of these conditions make the treatment of CIDP difficult. And this is where IgG antibodies play a nasty role in CIDP.

By Database Center for Life Science (DBCLS), CC BY 3.0, Link

Neurologists are now recognising that a subset of people with CIDP have IgG4 antibodies which greatly influence the clinical presentation and the treatment of CIDP. Anti-contactin antibody is one such antibody, but by far the most important is anti-neurofascin 155 (NF155). What do we know about this antibody? How does it influence the course of CIDP? To answer these questions, below are 10 important things we now know about CIDP associated with anti-NF155.

By BruceBlausOwn work, CC BY-SA 4.0, Link

1. Anti-NF155 is an antibody to paranodal structures

2. The antibody is present in 7-14% of people with CIDP

3. CIDP with anti-NF155 usually affects young subjects

4. Anti NF155 antibody CIDP is usually severe

5. Anti NF155 may cause central nervous system inflammation 

6. It causes a very high protein level in the spinal fluid

7. It causes very severe changes on nerve conduction studies

8. It responds poorly to intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIg)

9. It may respond to steroids and plasma exchange

10. Treatment-resistant cases may respond to Rituximab
By Oguenther at de.wikipediaOwn work mit Jmol auf Basis RCSB PDB: 2OSL​., Public Domain, Link

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Why not check out everything CIDP on Neurochecklists: