The 7 most ruthless bacterial infections of the nervous system

This is a follow up to our previous post, the 7 most devastating viral neurological infections. The list of bacteria that invade the nervous system is endless, but some stand out because of the fear they evoke, and the peril they pose. Here then are the 7 most horrifying bacterial infections that threaten the nervous […]

via The 7 most ruthless bacterial infections of the nervous system — Neurochecklists Updates

2 thoughts on “The 7 most ruthless bacterial infections of the nervous system

  1. I am not a neurologist, just a patient who had a stroke 4 ½ years ago caused by a caused by a bacterial infection called Whipple’s. I am still working to recover motion and feeling on left side head to toe. Getting better slowly. All other symptoms resolved since diagnosed (dx) on 05/16/13. Initial treatment was IV antibiotics (ceftriaxone) that penetrate the blood-brain membrane, were started immediately for 28 days to kill it and I continued to faithfully take antibiotic pills (trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole 160/800 mg) twice a day prevent relapse for 3 years until 04/12/16, when my infectious disease doc recommended I stop taking since available testing was negative and no more of the following symptoms:
    1) muscle soreness that started in 2007 never returned after dx
    2) malabsorption- I lost 40 lbs in 4 months just prior to stroke and now I have to work to maintain weight @ my normal 190 lbs.
    3) no change in brain damage as shown in 3 MRI’s with contrast
    4) no evidence of the bacteria after endoscopy and biopsy of upper intestine done at 1 year and 3 years post dx)
    5) Negative blood & stool PCR tests done annually (this has a 40% chance of false negative)
    No relapse so far, but I watch my weight and would be getting checked out ASAP if I felt same muscle soreness again.
    Overall, and I am actually quite healthy, but dead brain cells do not heal like the rest of the body, so working on rehab for the 4.5 years since stroke. If interested, here is a good explanation of it: http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1166639-overview

    Like

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