Monthly Archive: October, 2016

Masitinib, a breakthrough drug shattering neurology boundaries

In the process of writing a blog post on the research findings altering neurological practice, my sight fell on the drug, Masitinib. I was completely unaware of this tyrosine kinase inhibitor, one of the promising drugs in… Continue reading

Alzheimers disease and its promising links with diabetes

In the excellent book, The Innovators Prescription, the authors predict that precision medicine will replace intuitive medicine, and diseases will be defined by their underlying metabolic mechanisms, and not by the organs they affect, or the symptoms they… Continue reading

Why does dystonia fascinate and challenge neurology?

Dystonia is probably the most nebulous of neurological terms. Neurologists use the term for a vast array of neurological diseases. Dystonia also crops up as part of many complex neurological syndromes. Worse still, neurologists also use… Continue reading

Depression and the shrinking seahorses in the brain

Seahorses are beautiful creatures. The biologists convince us that seahorses are fish, even if they don’t look anything like fish. They also tell us, intriguingly, that seahorses are monogamous and the males do the… Continue reading

20 things we now know for certain about the Zika virus

Zika virus exploded into the news with striking images of children born with small heads in Brazil. This was at a time the country was struggling to plan for the Rio Olympics, and also embroiled in political turmoil.… Continue reading