The art of spinning catchy titles

How often is one turned off by a paper with a very convoluted or poorly worded title. One example I came across is The dangerousness of persons with the Othello syndrome. There are many other examples out there.

Fair use, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=1629138
Fair use, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=1629138

 

The focus here is however on articles with titles that not only reflect the topic, but play wonderfully with the words. This paper from Neurology is a classical example: Normal pressure hydrocephalus: how often does the diagnosis hold water?

 

By Vimont, Engelmann /Scan by NLM - National Library of Medicine (Call No. BF V765t 1835 OV2), Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=3750904
By Vimont, Engelmann /Scan by NLM – National Library of Medicine (Call No. BF V765t 1835 OV2), Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=3750904

 

What about this catchy title on absence epilepsy from Epilepsy Currents– The current state of absence epilepsy: can we have your attention?

 

What about this, alluding to the energy production role of mitochondria, from the Journal of Internal Medicine:  Batteries not included: diagnosis and management of mitochondrial disease. Surely alluding to the energy-generating function of mitochondria.

Vintage Arizona State University mitochondrial model. Gregory Han on Flikr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/typefiend/6819392279
Vintage Arizona State University mitochondrial model. Gregory Han on Flikr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/typefiend/6819392279

And this one is from Acta Neuropathologica Communications titled The prion hypothesis in Parkinson’s disease: Braak to the future. This is a reference to the Braak hypothesis which describes the spread of Parkinson’s disease pathology across the brain over time. Could prion diseases be responsible for Parkinson’s disease? For a clue, see my blog post, What are the links between prion diseases and parkinsonian disorders.

By Visanji, Naomi P., Patricia L. Brooks, Lili-Naz Hazrati, and Anthony E. Lang. - Visanji, Naomi P., Patricia L. Brooks, Lili-Naz Hazrati, and Anthony E. Lang. “The Prion Hypothesis in Parkinson’s Disease: Braak to the Future.” Acta Neuropathologica Communications 1, no. 1 (May 8, 2013): 2. doi:10.1186/2051-5960-1-2. http://www.actaneurocomms.org/content/1/1/2., CC BY 2.5, Link
By Visanji, Naomi P., Patricia L. Brooks, Lili-Naz Hazrati, and Anthony E. Lang. – Visanji, Naomi P., Patricia L. Brooks, Lili-Naz Hazrati, and Anthony E. Lang. “The Prion Hypothesis in Parkinson’s Disease: Braak to the Future.” Acta Neuropathologica Communications 1, no. 1 (May 8, 2013): 2. doi:10.1186/2051-5960-1-2. http://www.actaneurocomms.org/content/1/1/2., CC BY 2.5, Link
And from the journal Neurology again comes Blowing the whistle on sports concussions: will the risk of dementia change the game?  This, of course, is to do with the increasing recognition that repeated head injuries in athletes result in chronic traumatic encephalopathy. But is the sporting listening? You may wish to revisit my previous blog post on this, Will Smith and chronic traumatic encephalopathy.
football-1501700_1280
And from Brain comes this commentary titled Seizure prediction: making mileage on the long and winding road. It is not yet open access, and the synopsis doesn’t let the cat out of the bag. It is difficult therefore to establish what links the catchy title to the text. But it is still a work of art.
landscape-690588_1920

And finally, from Muscle and Nerve, comes Small fiber neuropathy: getting bigger! This is a review article highlighting the growing problem of a disorder with a self-deprecating name. Time to take notice!

By Dan Bennett - Flickr: marmaduke, CC BY 2.0, Link
By Dan BennettFlickr: marmaduke, CC BY 2.0, Link

Perhaps you have a few examples of your own to share.

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